GA-1912

GA-1912

 NATIONAL BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION (NBA)
of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
www.nbacares.org

Mark D. Anderson, President and CEO
January 2019

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Our Mission

Following God’s call, the National Benevolent Association exists to inspire and connect the people and ministries of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), to accompany one another in the creation of communities of compassion and care, and to advocate for the well-being of humanity.

Our Core Values

Serving as the Disciples health and social service general ministry for more than 130 years, NBA’s mission has been, and continues to be, responsive to the needs of the church and society. Over this long history, we have had the joy—and the challenge—of supporting the church across a rich array of issues. As the NBA, we are grounded in core values that focus our work:

  • Rooted in Compassionate Care: We celebrate those who have served before us in creating a just world. The NBA’s mission and work emerged from the faithful witness of six Disciples women seeking to address the needs of children and families in need. We value this legacy of serving the “least of these” and endeavor to root all our initiatives in the value and dignity of human life and in serving a world that God so loves.
  • Accountability: We claim our duty to be effective stewards of the resources entrusted to us. We are fiscally responsible and acknowledge our accountability to our partners and the communities we serve. We treat others with respect and strive to conduct our work in the spirit of transparency and openness. Where there is brokenness, we strive for reconciliation.
  • Collaborative Partnerships: We believe that meaningful results to build compassionate and caring communities happen only when we can work in partnership with God and a wide diversity of others – individuals, communities, churches and organizations. We affirm that by working with partners, as well as those we serve, and by practicing humble leadership, we have what we need to make a difference.
  • Accompaniment: We value the creative voice and mind of all people as we seek to heed God’s call, especially in developing solutions through creative and innovative efforts designed to address personal challenges and systemic oppression. As we assume a posture of openness, we find in each other’s company the “bread” that will sustain us all. As we share life’s joys and struggles, at times picking up one another’s load and going the hard way together, we create communities of compassion and care.
  • Forward Leaning: We commit to learning and adapting as we move into the future. We understand that during times of change and new directions, the path forward often involves uncertainty and challenges. Through our shared efforts of advocacy, education, pastoral response, and professional care and services, we move towards the health and well-being of all.

NBA Mission and Ministry Grant Program

2018 was the second year of NBA’s Mission and Ministry Grant Program, supporting Disciples congregations and health and social service ministries working with older adults and at-risk children and youth across the life of the church. Utilizing approved, purpose-restricted funds in these two areas, grants are available for Disciples congregations and health and social service ministries across three categories/amounts:

  • Catalyst Grants: $1,000 – $5,000: These are startup funds to get projects up and running and/or to expand an existing project to a new area/initiative.
  • Innovation Grants: $6,000 – $15,000: These funds should help move an established project to a new level of effectiveness and impact.
  • Impact Grants: $20,000+: These funds should be used for major leaps in project areas with a proven plan for how these will move the organization to a new level of sustainability and impact.

The Grant Committee accepted applications during the summer/fall 2018, and grantees were announced in December 2018. For this second cohort, the NBA granted a total of $157,900 to 20 Disciples projects located across 13 Disciples regions. Of these 20 selected projects, nine are focused on at-risk children and youth; six are focused on older adults; and five are intergenerational, serving both communities. Eight of these grantees also received Mission and Ministry Grant funds from NBA last year. Stories and impact reports from these grantees will be shared throughout the year.

 Our Ministries and Partners

Serving as the church’s health and social services general ministry, the NBA partners with congregations, regions, general ministries, and a variety of Disciples-related health and social service providers. Our shared work advances care for and with others in our communities and raises awareness of needs that are often overlooked and forgotten—needs such as affordable housing; spiritual care for the incarcerated and returning citizens; children and family services; programs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities; care and advocacy for older adults; hunger and food security; mental health and wellness; and other needs as they emerge.

Today’s ministries of the NBA are grounded in our historic mission of “caring for the least of these.” Our missional vision is to inspire and invite people of faith into this shared work and ministry responding to God’s call to be compassionate listeners, organizers, and advocates. Together, we create communities of compassion and care.

 NBA Incubate Initiative

The NBA Incubate Initiative strives to encourage and support the development of new and innovative health and social service ministries and organizations by Disciples. These ministries, in turn, inform and inspire fellow Disciples throughout our communities and across the life of the church. Together, we expand the church’s understanding of and capacity for health and social service ministry as part of Christ’s work in the world. The goal of this initiative is to support and empower new Disciple-related health and social service organizations, projects, and ministries—what we’re also calling social enterprises—to focus on their growth, strengthen their impact, and work toward sustainability.

As of January 2019, nine ministries are formally affiliated with the NBA as part of the NBA Incubate Initiative. We help these entities strategically strengthen areas such as board development, capacity building, administrative mentoring, marketing and communications, fundraising and development, bookkeeping services, sustainability, Disciples relationships, and more. Two of NBA’s first Incubate Partners, Reach Beyond Mission and Tulsa’s Table, have concluded their formal Incubate affiliation with NBA, while two new Incubate Partners are beginning: Garden of Eden Health Center, operating in Jayuya, PR, and New Communion, in Winston-Salem, NC.

In March 2018, the NBA hosted its fourth Incubate Retreat for emerging Disciples-related health and social service ministry leaders to create intentional space for rest, renewal, and equipping for the ministry of social entrepreneurship. In September 2018, the NBA again hosted the SENT Seminar: Equipping Social Entrepreneurs for Leadership and Change. This training brought together 21 Disciples-related health and social service ministry start-ups to learn and share in a variety of topics, including leadership coaching, legal principles for faith-based entities, marketing, and fundraising.

The NBA Incubate Initiative also continued our Social Enterprise Resource Bank, an online clearinghouse featuring blogs, webinars, and other resources to help support Disciples social entrepreneurs and ministries across the life of the church. Virtual learning opportunities include an expanded webinar series, with topics in 2018 including fundraising, community transformation, mission/vision/values, board development, and succession planning.

NBA XPLOR

In 2018-19, we are now in our fifth year of NBA XPLOR, a 10-month, faith-based residency for young adults who are exploring the intersections of the life of faith and the work of justice. The Residency provides 10-months of leadership development and vocational discernment for 21- to 30-year-olds to live simply in community and engage in direct service and justice work. In 2018-19, NBA XPLOR placed 19 Residents at six host sites—St. Louis, MO; Hiram-Mantua, OH; Tucson-Marana, AZ; Spokane, WA; Dallas, TX; and Charlotte, NC—the latter serving as a new, second-year Residency experience called XPLORmore.

The cohort begins with an intensive week of orientation and anti-oppression training, called XPLOR Laboratory, held in St. Louis in late August before the XPLOR Residents travel to their host communities. There, NBA XPLOR Residents serve six hours a week with their host congregations and about 30 hours a week through community engagement site internships spanning a variety of health, social services, and social justice ministries and organizations.

NBA XPLOR Residents are currently working with low-income families, unhoused individuals, people with disabilities, older adults, vulnerable children, and undocumented persons, among others. They are learning grant writing, event planning, community advocacy, and much, much more. These professional and leadership skills make a huge impact. Through their dedicated work, spiritual practices, and exploration this year, these young adults are now discerning calls to social work, education, community organizing, medicine, military, ministry, and more.

In February 2018, we hosted an NBA XPLOR Reunion, gathering with 25 Alumni Residents and three Spiritual Companions who had completed XPLOR in the past three program years. The weekend reunion included worship; free time for fellowship and renewal; conversation and resources around personal and professional development and leadership opportunities across the life of the church; and a visual story-building exercise allowing XPLOR Alumni to continue processing the impact of the XPLOR experience on their lives. We are grateful to the Theodore and Beulah Beasley Foundation for the grant funding that made this event possible, and we look forward to reuniting with future cohorts of XPLOR Alumni in the coming years.

Advocacy and Activism

We also continue to deepen our engagement in Advocacy and Activism to transform the root causes of social injustice. In NBA’s strategic planning for 2018-2021, we named Advocacy and Activism as a strategic priority, flowing from NBA’s mission to “advocate for the well-being of humanity.” Following the trajectory of the work begun with the Ferguson Justice Initiative, these efforts utilize relationships, wisdom, and processes built and tested through that work.

Through a 0.5 FTE Program Coordinator for Advocacy and Activism, the NBA nurtures engagement strategies to equip and train partners to address the critical social justice issues most relevant to their work, and collaborates with NBA staff to cultivate partnerships across the life of the church to coordinate efforts related to social justice theology, action, and advocacy.  In 2018, this position focused on three initiatives:

AR/PR Mid-America Project:

The pilot project explores what a new decentralized model for Disciples justice infrastructure could look like in a region. The work grows out of NBA’s early investment in local clergy in St. Louis during the Ferguson movement. The merger of the St. Louis Racial Justice Group and AR/PR Justice Ministry of Mid-America has happened, adding a 2.0 Community Organizing Training to the traditional 1.0 Basic Anti-Racism Training. In 2015, the NBA hosted the first Racial Justice Summit in Mid-America. In 2018, Mid-America hired a conference organizer and assumed the continuation and ownership of that conference in the region. Approximately 60 people, including all three Regional ministers, were in attendance as the group mapped initial justice action plans and work in the region. 

Advocacy and Activism Peer Group:

This new peer group aims to bring together a new generation of activists and advocates to share, learn, and grow in their ministries and relationships. The group launched in August 2018 and will end in August 2020, meeting virtually and in-person with a particular focus on social justice issues; language and the theological foundations of social justice; and direct action and advocacy efforts.

Disciples Public Presence Working Group:

The Standing Rock Protests and other social justice crises led to the creation of Disciples Public Presence, a Facebook group and advocacy platform to give Disciples a common place to share their life in current justice movements. In October 2018, the first Disciples Public Presence Conference and Working Group were formed, gathering more than 60 Disciples and 25 working group members committed to strengthening the justice infrastructure by implementing priorities in worship/theology, communications, mass mobilization and sustained organizing. The NBA, along with several other justice-related ministries, provided staff time and programmatic support to ensure the forward momentum of the movement.

Prison and Jail Ministries

The NBA connects collaborative communities of Disciples working together on particular health and social service justice issues. Through Prison and Jail Ministries, the NBA supports Disciples engaged in spiritual care and advocacy ministries with those who are or have been incarcerated and their families. This area of work centers around education, inspiration, and advocacy. The Prison and Jail Ministries webinar series continued in 2018, with topics including immigration detention, how to start a prison congregation, restorative justice, and moving beyond the labels to the humanization of God’s children. Webinar topics planned for 2019 include bail reform, voting rights, immigration detention of children and families, and a spotlight on The Marshall Project.

Prison and Jail Ministries Peer Group:

The first cohort of this peer group concluded its time together in April 2018, after meeting and serving together for two years. They focused on public narrative—how to share their stories and clearly convey the significant impact of ministries through the context of prisons and jails. NBA Prison and Jail Ministries helped participants workshop and prepare their narratives, and then recorded and produced videos with each ministry.

In August 2018, NBA launched the second cohort of the Prison and Jail Ministries Peer Group, welcoming 10 members to this two-year peer group experience, which focuses on: 1) education through peer-to-peer learning and sharing experiences, expertise, and resources on prison- and jail-related issues; 2) inspiration through spiritual renewal practices and self-care; and 3) advocacy by engaging in a collaborative service or advocacy project. This cohort will give some particular attention to the issues of immigration and detention.

Mental Health Initiative

The NBA takes seriously its call to create communities of compassion and care through dialogue and action centered on issues related to mental health. With hopes to support the prioritization of mental health and wellness in the life of the church, the Mental Health Initiative aims to establish the necessary awareness and understanding required to counter stigma and change the landscape of conversation regarding mental illness and disorders within the church. The Mental Health Initiative’s five main vision areas are to cultivate welcome by countering stigma; provide resources and educational support; collaborate and connect with Disciples congregations, health and social services ministries, and other mental health and wellness providers; encourage the sustainability and innovation of mental health ministries in congregations, regions, and the general church; and support clergy mental health and wellness.

This shared work supporting mental health extended to regional ministry through the Regional Mental Health Initiative with the Christian Church in Georgia (GAMHI), providing education, support, and infrastructure development to Disciples leaders and congregations in the Georgia Region. This pilot partnership concluded in 2018, with the Georgia Region and NBA reporting on the impact of this shared work in January 2019. The GAMHI will continue beyond this pilot partnership, with a full slate of regional programming in 2019 and beyond.

The NBA Mental Health Initiative continued to be present at a variety of church-wide gatherings, learning opportunities, and self-care retreats in 2018, including with Week of Compassion, Pension Fund, Obra Hispana Asamblea, National Convocation Biennial Session, NAPAD Convocation, Hope Partnership’s Leadership Academy, the Rocky Mountain and Capital Area Regional Assemblies, the Women in Ministry Conference, Hispanic Ministries Young Adult Leadership and Development Conference, and more.

The Mental Health Initiative webinar series also continued in 2018, with topics including immigration trauma, how to start a mental health ministry with your congregation, and clergy mental health and wellness. Webinar topics planned for 2019 include grief and loss, suicide post-vention, and children and trauma. In 2018, the Mental Health Initiative also focused its efforts to support ministries in becoming adept at identifying and addressing issues related to mental health and congregational life, through a Liturgical/Theological Resources Task Team and a Mental Health Justice Task Team. The Resources Task Team produced a video for Mental Health Awareness Sunday in May 2018 and released a series of Advent reflections and worship resources in December 2018.

Chaplains Peer Group:

The Mental Health Initiative is making the final preparations for a new Chaplains Peer Group to launch in early 2019. The vision of this peer group is to provide an opportunity for likeminded individuals living out their call through chaplaincy to focus on: 1) education through peer-to-peer learning and sharing experiences, expertise, and resources on chaplaincy related issues; 2) inspiration through spiritual renewal practices and self-care; and 3) advocacy by engaging in a collaborative service or advocacy project. Influenced by the needs of the cohort, this peer group will also give particular attention to the issues of mental health, personal spiritual devotion practices, and healthy work/life balance formation.

Disciples-Related Health and Social Service Ministries

The NBA continues to support and partner with a network of care providers and justice-minded individuals who serve as the “hands and feet of God” in their communities. Our goals are to connect, resource, and amplify these ministries, providing access to a constellation of support and services, such as marketing and development consulting, executive coaching, back-office accounting, and executive searches, as well as networking with other partners through webinars, educational trainings, and peer learning and wellness group opportunities.

The Connect Conference for Disciples-related Health and Social Service Ministries was held in October 2018. This conference offered educational, connectional, inspirational, and advocacy opportunities to support direct service providers in “Making connections in the 21st Century.” We welcomed 20 attendees from 14 partner ministries and organizations. Highlights included a session on “Common Sense Technology Solutions for Non-Profits,” and a dinner gathering at the home of the NBA President and CEO Mark Anderson. Ideas for ongoing connection with this group include regional and issue-based affinity groups and quarterly online Wisdom Garden conversations.

Executive Leaders / Marketing and Development Peer Groups:

The first cohorts for the Executive Leaders Peer Group and Marketing and Development Peer Group cohorts concluded their time together in summer 2018. The vision of these peer groups is to provide an opportunity to cultivate support and encouragement, mutual dialogue, spiritual renewal, and peer-to-peer learning. There has been time for rest, joyful shared conversation, and group learning with others who truly understand the challenges and gifts of health and social service ministry and faith-based nonprofits in the current environment. The second cohort of the Executive Leaders Peer Group will launch in early 2019.

 A directory of Disciples-related health and social service ministries connected with NBA follows this report. For more information about all NBA ministries, and for stories, upcoming events, and worship and study resources, please visit www.nbacares.org.

 

DISCIPLES-RELATED HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICE MINISTRIES

 

A Small Hand
Ann McBroom, Executive Director
Edinburg Christian Church
210 Center Street, PO Box 117, Edinburg, Virginia 22824-0117
(540) 933-6313
www.helpingshenandoahcountyinfantsinneed.blogspot.com

A Small Hand provides age-appropriate food, diapers, and hygiene essentials to infants in need from newborns to 36 months in the Shenandoah County of Virginia. The focus of our ministry is to serve as a specialist pantry providing care to the youngest and most vulnerable members of our community. All of our clients are enrolled in government supplemental feeding programs (SNAP/Food Stamps or WIC). As these programs were never designed to provide a full month of nutrition, families and infants often do not have enough for non-food essentials such as diapers, feeding bottles, pacifiers, and hygiene essentials. These are the gaps that A Small Hand fills. As an all-volunteer agency, the vision and goals of A Small Hand are that children can reach their full developmental potential.

Chain Reaction Ministries
David Finklea, Executive Director
Memorial Drive Christian Church: 11750 Memorial Drive, Houston, Texas 77024
First Christian Church: 3700 N. Walker Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118
(713) 789-0060
www.chainreactionbikes.org

Chain Reaction Ministries provides freedom of transportation to those in need through a ministry of bicycle recycling. Started at Memorial Drive Christian Church in Houston, Texas, CRM recycles bicycles by linking donors with identified needs in the community. CRM had humble beginnings in 2009 by answering a call by Westside Homeless Partnership for used bikes for kids in their program. People have an emotional attachment to their bicycles. It was their first bike, or their kid’s first bike – and they don’t simply want to set it on the curb, or donate it to a large, faceless charity. They want to know that their bike can provide the same freedom and hope to a person in need that they experienced.

Child Saving Institute
Peg Harriott, President and CEO
4545 Dodge Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68132
(402) 553-6000
www.childsaving.org

Child Saving Institute provides a safe haven and healing for thousands of innocent young victims of family crisis, neglect and abuse. We offer the vital services necessary to make at-risk children safe and fractured families whole through programs such as early childhood education, foster care, adoption, an emergency shelter, parenting classes and therapy. Our mission is “responding to the cry of a child,” but it is our vision that guides us as we work to give the children we serve safe, happy childhoods. Our vision is that all children have homes where hope is kindled and dreams can be achieved. This is our work, and they are ALL our children.

Christian Care Communities
Mary Lynn Spaulding, President/CEO
12710 Townepark Way, Suite 1000, Louisville, Kentucky 40243
(800) 662-1738
www.christiancarecommunities.org

Christian Care Communities is the oldest provider of older adult care related to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). We are Kentucky’s largest faith-based provider of housing, long-term care, adult day centers, and community based services for older adults. We serve approximately 3,000 individuals and their families throughout Kentucky. We actively work with churches helping them with older adult ministries.

Christian Church Homes (CCH)
Don Stump, President and CEO
303 Hegenberger Road, Suite 201, Oakland, California 94621
(510) 632-6712
www.cchnc.org

At Christian Church Homes (CCH) we build and manage affordable housing communities where seniors can live and thrive in the comfort of their own homes, because we believe doing so is better for communities as a whole and the seniors we serve. Having served more than 100,000 seniors over 50 years, CCH has now grown to 57 caring communities that are More Than a Home to residents in seven states.

Christian Services for Children in Alabama
Gerri Johnson, Board Chair
1792 Highway 14 East, Selma, Alabama 36702
(334) 875-0608

Christian Services for Children in Alabama strives to be an organization that has a positive, recognizable, long-term impact on ALL children and youth in our care by providing professional, cost-effective, and timely services. CSCA is a pioneer for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Alabama/Northwest Florida in promoting ministries that nurture, restore, and reclaim those children who have experienced various types of abuse and neglect. We provide opportunities for families and individuals (who wish) to share their love, time, and resources to nurture vulnerable children and youth toward independence and enriched lives.

Cleveland Christian Home
Charles Tuttle, CEO
1400 West 25th Street, 2nd Floor, Cleveland, Ohio 44113
(216) 671-0977
www.cchome.org

Cleveland Christian Home exists to be a haven of hope and healing for children, youth and families struggling with mental illness, abuse and neglect. Cleveland Christian Home will be a center of excellence providing the highest quality services to meet the physical, emotional, intellectual, cultural and spiritual needs of children, youth and families.

Columbia Area Older Adult Ministry
Rev. Sally A. Robinson, Chaplain
101 North Tenth Street, Columbia, Missouri 65201
(573) 819-5043

The Columbia Area Older Adult Ministry (CAOAM) provides spiritual and emotional support to the growing elderly population in long-term care and retirement communities in the Columbia, MO, area. Though this is an ecumenical ministry, it is recognized as a ministry of First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Columbia, MO. Currently CAOAM provides spiritual support in seven long-term care and retirement communities on a regular schedule.

Disciple Homes Management Group
Karen Wardlaw, Administrator/CEO
327 Eden Drive, Longview, Texas 75605
(903) 845-7638
www.disciplehomes.org

Disciple Homes has been providing quality affordable housing for senior adults (age 62 years or older) and their household since 1972 in Northeast Texas. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, rental assistance is available to all of our residents that qualify. Qualified residents pay 30% of their adjusted income for rent and utilities. Disciple Homes Management Group provides social services and housing to meet the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual needs of person, in the loving and caring spirit of Christ.

Disciples Retirement Community of Oklahoma (DRCO)
Sallie Spillman, Board Member
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Oklahoma
301 NW 36th St., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118
580-821-6561

Disciples Retirement Community of Oklahoma (DRCO) provides funding to assist Disciples older adults living in Bradford Village senior living community in Edmond, OK.

Florida Christian Center
Rev. Kimberly Weir, Executive Director
1115 Edgewood Avenue S., Jacksonville, Florida 32205
(904) 981-3095
www.flchristiancenter.org

The Florida Christian Center provides ministry, pastoral care, worship services, classes on faith and aging and other programs and services focused on the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of the senior and disabled residents in our community. Serving more than 300 residents in three buildings—Sundale Manor Apartments and Florida Christian Apartments provide subsidized housing for senior and disabled adults, along with Edgewood Condominiums, a senior community on-site—and with a full-time Activity Director and full-time Chaplain/Executive Director, FCC seeks to provide an array of services that honor the body, mind and spirit.

Garden of Eden Health Center
Alicia Rodriguez Davila, Founder/CEO
2833 Eagle Eye Court
Kissimmee, FL 34746
(407) 414-5511
www.gardenofedenhealthcenter.org

The Garden of Eden Health Center (GOEHC) is a vision of a future community health clinic; a faith-based health education program focused on women, infants, and children; and a senior and therapeutic health center, deep in the heart of the central mountain range (Cordillera Central) of Jayuya, Puerto Rico. As a not-for-profit healthcare organization, GOEHC aims to provide quality healthcare, preventive medicine, and holistic health education to higher risk communities (rural residences, women, children, and seniors), while also providing local work and volunteer opportunities for children, youth, and families.

 HER Faith Ministries
Rev. Elaine Y. Sanford, Executive Director
3396 Park Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38111
(901) 324-3705
www.herfaithministries.org

HER Faith Ministries is a 501(c)(3) Christian charity that provides assistance to homeless and needy women and children. The ministry provides emergency food, clothing, transportation, dental assistance, and housing to impoverished women and children. HER Faith also provides family counseling and programs for ministry and reading to incarcerated individuals.

Hiram Farm
Leeanne Saro Jereb, Executive Director
PO Box 157, Hiram, Ohio 44234
(330) 569-3441
www.hiramfarm.org

Hiram Farm is a nonprofit organization, agricultural setting that serves developmentally disabled adults, with an emphasis on adults on the autism spectrum. The Farm provides opportunities for these adults to grow, learn, and work in a setting focused on respect and support for individuals and the environment. Here, farmers can develop both professional and social skills and accomplish meaningful work. The program began serving six adults with autism in June 2009. Today, the Farm has grown to provide meaningful work for 24 farmers.

Juliette Fowler Communities
Nicole Gann, President and CEO
1234 Abrams Road, Dallas, Texas 75214
(214) 827-0813
www.fowlercommunities.org

Juliette Fowler Communities is a neighborhood of choice and connection, of caring and service, of faith and fulfillment. Founded more than 120 years ago as an intergenerational community, Fowler serves children, youth and seniors, as well as their families, at our East Dallas location. As a continuing care retirement community, Fowler’s residential services and care offerings for older adults include: Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Support, Health and Rehabilitation, and Affordable Senior Housing. As an intergenerational community, Fowler’s residential offerings for children, youth and young women include: Foster-to-Adopt and The Ebby House.

Manistee Manor Apartment Homes
Debi Windahl, Administrator
7987 N. 53rd Avenue, Glendale, Arizona 85301
(623) 915-5039
www.manisteemanor.com

In the loving and caring spirit of Christ, Disciples House of Glendale Inc. and Manistee Manor are passionately committed to exceed the needs and expectations of our residents by providing quality senior housing and other services to enhance the lives of those we serve in a friendly family-style community environment. A place our residents are proud to call home. Manistee provides apartment home rentals for our low-income senior residents in a safe and caring environment where they can continue to age in place independently (with or without the help of out-side services) in an active senior community.

Mission Behind Bars and Beyond
Rev. Dean Bucalos, Executive Director
PO Box 22-34, Louisville, Kentucky, 40252
(502) 396-3543
www.missionbehindbarsandbeyond.org

Mission Behind Bars and Beyond is a nonprofit, faith-based organization providing community based mentoring programs for those released from prison and returning to communities in Kentucky. In conjunction with a Disciples of Christ congregation, New Life in Christ Christian Church, which is located in a women’s halfway house, we minister to those incarcerated, train outside volunteers to form Nurture, Support and Accountability Groups (NSAG) and connect returning citizens with a NSAG which will then walk alongside each person for six months to a year to equip them for a successful re-entry into the community to which they are returning.

New Communion
Rev. David Harrison, Jr., Director
2320 Country Club Road, Winston-Salem, NC 27104
(336) 722-2714
www.newcommunion.org

New Communion is a faith-based organization with the goal of enhancing community relationships and diminishing the impacts of hunger and food insecurity. We are committed to providing nourishing food and being in relationship with those experiencing food insecurity and hunger in the communities we serve. Through the model of Asset Based Community Development, New Communion emphasizes shared abundance in ways that transform individuals and systems of poverty. We function as an interfaith organization and utilize interdisciplinary practices in order to promote healthy food systems through shared abundance and redistribution of resources. Currently, New Communion is feeding over 150 local families a week, and would like to continue to grow, increasing the number of families being fed, using shared abundance and expanding our food and financial sponsorship to support securing healthy nutrition for all.

Oakland Peace Center
Rev. Sandhya Jha, Executive Director
111 Fairmount Avenue, Oakland, California 94611
www.oaklandpeacecenter.org

As an emerging social entrepreneurship nonprofit model of ministry, the Oakland Peace Center exists as a physical space (40,000 square feet gifted by First Christian Church of Oakland) and a network of people and organizations (over 40 Bay Area based nonprofits). It brings together more than 40 direct service, advocacy, youth empowerment, art and culture-shift nonprofits to connect and collaborate with each other in the struggle for peace and justice.

Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center (OFEC)
Rev. Sharyn Cosby, Executive Director
1020 South Garnett Road, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74128
(918) 551-6017
www.ofec.co

Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center, a related organization of In the Spirit Christian Church, is a not-for-profit agency that seeks to provide resources and assistance to individuals and their families that will empower them to live a successful and purposeful life. In an effort to reduce the disparity of minority contact with law enforcement, Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center has entered into an agreement with the City of Tulsa and partnered with various state, local, and community agencies to implement the Tulsa County Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Community and Strategic Planning Demonstration Project through a grant funded by the Office of Juvenile Affairs.

Patchwork Central / Sozo Health Ministry
Rev. John Rich and Amy Rich, Co-Executive Directors
100 Washington Avenue, Evansville, Indiana 47713
(812) 424-2735
www.patchwork.org

Patchwork Central has worked to serve its neighborhood through flexible and innovative programming that matches the talents and interests of those involved to the needs of our community. Today, Patchwork serves individuals and families with a food pantry (since 1982), neighborhood hospitality (a cup of coffee, telephone usage, someone to listen, etc.), a community garden (created in 1995), low-rent facilities for other community organizations, a bicycle program for the homeless, a Health Ministry, and unique art/education programs (Arts & Smarts) that have been available free of charge to at-risk children and youth since 1980. As part of the community fabric, Patchwork Central changes the lives of those it serves by giving them a sense of hope, a place of acceptance, and a bright outlook for the future.

QC Family Tree
Rev. Helms Jarrell and Rev. Greg Jarrell, Executive Directors
2910 Parkway Avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina 28208
(704) 654-7429
www.qcfamilytree.org

QC Family Tree’s mission is to be kinfolk rooted in discipleship in West Charlotte, NC. They embody this mission through creativity, prayer, and welcome. The Family Tree offers hospitality in their homes to neighbors who are in transition. Participants enjoy family-style meals each evening with neighbors and guests and gather for prayer every weekday morning and midday. The ministry has grown to include: Freedom School summer literacy camp, Wednesday evening dinner and devotionals for youth and children, twice monthly community meals, arts activities, young adult leadership development through internship programs, edible gardens, community outreach activities, and microbusiness in order that provides employment to neighbors as well as sustainable income to their nonprofit.

Reach Beyond Mission
Rev. Mary Lu Johnston, Executive Director
15907 Braesgate Drive, Austin, Texas 78717
(512) 218-4335
www.reachbeyondmission.org

Reach Beyond Mission is a fully planned youth mission/poverty education experience. Youth join youth from other churches across the country to explore issues of culture, gender, and poverty in an urban setting. Participants volunteer at numerous metropolitan area nonprofits working with the homeless, low-income families, children, people with disabilities, and the elderly. Summer mission week focus on food justice, housing, or advocacy. RBM provides speakers, age-appropriate activities, and discussion starters to help young people explore the biblical, theological, economic, social, and political issues related to poverty. Our goal is to help youth begin to explore how to spend a lifetime changing the systems that sustain poverty through their votes, career choices, and how they spend their money.

Recovery Café San Jose
Ken Goldstein, Executive Director
80 South 5th Street, San Jose, CA 95112
(408) 294-2963

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Recovery Cafe San Jose is a healing community for those traumatized by homelessness, addiction, and mental health challenges. We are founded on the belief that every human being is precious, worthy of love, and deserving of the opportunities to fulfill his or her potential. Located in the heart of downtown San Jose, Recovery Cafe San Jose members come for long-term support in a safe, sober, and supportive environment. Program elements include Recovery Circles (small, peer-support groups), School for Recovery classes in job and life skills, group meals, guest speakers, creative activities, and connections to community resources. Through the Cafe, members gather the skills and strength needed to gain and maintain employment and housing, and achieve their goals in health, family, and sobriety.

Safe Haven Day Shelter
Joni Laurence and Donna Hawley, Co-Coordinators
6165 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, Virginia 22044
(703) 532-8220
www.fccfc.org/safe-haven/

Safe Haven in Falls Church, VA, is a drop-in program working together with Northern Virginia Family Services to provide a welcoming environment for those experiencing homelessness and poverty. This program began as an outreach program at First Christian Church to an average of 15-20 individuals and has grown to a drop-in program serving more than 100 clients weekly, now an interfaith coalition of faith-based communities contributing hot meals and volunteers to the program.

Serra Center
Lisa Senadenos, CEO
2610 Central Avenue, Suite 120, Union City, California 94587
(510) 477-1000
www.serracenter.org

Serra Center offers three types of support services for individuals with developmental disabilities. Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF-DDH) provides 24-hour care and supervision in six-bed homes in residential neighborhoods. Individuals in Supported Living Services live in the environment of their choice, with care and support based on their individual needs. Independent Living Services provide services focusing on specific identified living skills, working toward eliminating the need for services when the skills are mastered. All individuals served are active during the day either at jobs or in a day program

SHARE (Sharing Hands: A Respite Experience)
Rev. Tom Jones, Executive Director
3500 N. A Street, Suite 2200, Midland, Texas 79705
(432) 818-1253
http://sharewtx.org

Upon the diagnosis of a child’s disability, families find themselves on a lonely journey in which they are isolated from friends, other families who care for children with special needs, and the community. The constant care demands of the child’s disability create stress and leave little time for relationships and personal care. SHARE provides respite care for these families, including parent support groups, counseling services, family events, and programming for siblings. SHARE cares for the whole family because strong families are needed to provide care for the person with special needs—now and well into the future.

Southern Christian Services for Children and Youth, Inc.
Jamie Himes, Executive Director
860 East River Place, Suite 104, Jackson, Mississippi 39202
(601) 354-0983
www.scscy.org

SCSCY provides services through 11 different statewide locations including therapeutic group homes for children and youth, a transitional living facility for older teens who are homeless, an array of adoption, therapeutic foster case, and post adoption services, and education services that include independent living preparation for teens in the foster care system, and abstinence education for at-risk youth.

SquareOne Villages (formerly Opportunity Village)
Rev. Dan Bryant, Executive Director
458 Blair Boulevard, Eugene, Oregon 97402
(541) 606-4455
www.squareonevillages.org

As we grow into an organization with multiple projects, Opportunity Village Eugene has recently evolved to SquareOne Villages. Our mission continues to be to create self-managed communities of low-cost tiny houses for people in need of housing. SquareOne Villages has two projects: Opportunity Village Eugene, which provides transitional shelter for approximately 35 people, and Emerald Village Eugene, an affordable housing project of 22 tiny homes being built in fall 2016. Both communities provide stable, safe and sustainable places for people in need of housing through alternative, cost-effective approaches.

StoneSoup Community Venture / Tulsa’s Table
Rev. Christy Moore, Founder and CEO
2232 S. Nogales Ave. Tulsa, OK 74107
(918) 984-8225
www.tulsastable.org

Tulsa’s Table is a project of StoneSoup Community Venture, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization established in 2010. Our identity springs from the heart of the stone soup folktale, in which community members provide valuable contributions that turn a soup of stone into a nourishing, sustainable meal. The mission of Tulsa’s Table is to provide enriching, seed-to-table educational experiences as solutions to hunger and poverty for youth living in at-risk communities in Tulsa. Our objective is to nourish community for a purpose by providing opportunities for youth to obtain solid job and life skills through the learning laboratory operations of a food production garden and our pay-what-you-can community café. The long-range goal is for our garden and café to be fully operated by graduates of our programming who develop a sense of ownership in the operation through their learning experiences at Tulsa’s Table. The garden will supply fresh, locally-grown food to the café that will function five days per week, serving lunch or dinner to everyone on a pay-what-you-can basis.

The Summit
Gina Meadows, Executive Director
1400 Enterprise Drive, Lynchburg, Virginia 24502
(434) 941-7606
www.summitlynchburg.com

The Summit is a senior living community providing an environment for each resident to be engaged in life. We provide services, amenities and facilities that support an active lifestyle in Independent Living for each individual. As residents’ needs change, The Summit’s campus has a continuum of care available through Assisted Living and The Summit Health and Rehab Center.

Tennyson Center for Children
Ned Breslin, CEO
2950 Tennyson Center, Denver, Colorado 80212
(303) 433-2541
www.tennysoncenter.org

Tennyson Center provides 24-hour intensive residential care, day treatment, special education and home/community based services for approximately 150 children and their families every day. Children with severe behavioral and mental health problems along with educational delays are the primary client population. The families of these children have experienced or are experiencing extreme trauma, physical and/or sexual abuse, mental illness, substance abuse, or extreme poverty and/or homelessness. Tennyson is a leader in advocating for the needs of all children and families in need in Colorado through legislative and policy development.

UrbanMission Community Partners
Rev. Al Lopez, President
810 S. White Avenue, Pomona, CA 91766
(909) 764-8054
http://www.um-cp.org

Located on the campus of UrbanMission (a UCC/DOC new church start), UMCP is a community-focused nonprofit organization that seeks community wholeness, resilience, and sustainability in the Pomona area of Los Angeles County, California, by working with families and individuals at risk from poverty, hunger, homelessness, incarceration, and/or inadequate education and healthcare. In cooperation with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the United Church of Christ, as well as other denominations, faith communities, neighborhoods, community organizations, and public/ government entities​, UMCP​ actively seeks out and develops opportunities to empower and walk with our community towards a brighter tomorrow. This includes but is not limited to: Social service provision to individuals, families, and neighborhoods at risk from poverty, hunger, homelessness, incarceration, and/or inadequate education and health care. Other opportunities for UMCP’s intended work include involvement in nonviolent civic engagement; advocacy for social uplift in local, state, and national legislation; urban agriculture; supportive and transitional housing for vulnerable populations; and deeply inclusive neighborhoods

Woodhaven
Mark Palmer, CEO
1405 Hathman Place, Columbia, Missouri 65201
(573) 881-9840
www.woodhaventeam.org

Woodhaven is a caring team advocating for those with disabilities. Its Community Living program supports more than 100 men and women in more than 50 apartments and homes, and its Community Connections program provides opportunities for individuals who do not work during the day. Our mission is not just about providing supports; it is about working toward a fundamental shift in how the community perceives people with disabilities. Every day, the men and women we support are living full, independent lives as active members of the community. With every shirt they buy, hour they work, and life they touch, they’re changing the face of ability.

 

NBA Board of Trustees
Jackie Compton Bunch, Chair, Columbus, Ohio
Bob Cooper, Vice Chair, Denver, Colorado
Mary Lou Kegler, Secretary, Kansas City, Missouri
William Jennison, Treasurer, Spokane, Washington
Cindy Kim Hengst, At-Large, Chicago, Illinois
Jabari Butler, Atlanta, Georgia
Alex Cooper, Cleburne, Texas
Jacque Foster, St. Louis, Missouri
Willie Garcia, Yonkers, New York
Ariel Kidwell, Dallas, Texas
Audrey Jackson, Cleveland, Ohio
Lisa Legeer, Jacksonville, Florida
Cristian Marin, Eureka, Illinois
Suzanne Quenette, Austin, Texas
Darren Phelps, Washington, D.C.
Orlando Scott, Norcross, Georgia
Mark D. Anderson, St. Louis, Missouri*
Terri Hord Owens, Indianapolis, Indiana**
Michael Readinger, Cleveland, Ohio**
*Ex-Officio with Vote

**Ex-Officio without Vote

 

NBA Staff
Mark D. Anderson, President and CEO
Dietra Wise Baker, Program Coordinator for Advocacy and Activism
Jordan Bles, Director of Development
Ben Bohren, Mission Specialist, NBA XPLOR
Dean Bucalos, Mission Specialist, Prison and Jail Ministries
Dani Loving Cartwright, Vice President of Operations
Lesley Durham, Director of Operations Accounting
Angelica Santiago Gonzalez, Administrative Assistant, Operations
Rebecca Hale, Executive Vice President
Héctor J. Hernández, Coordinator, NBA Connect Ministries
Monica Wedlock Kilpatrick, Director of NBA Connect Ministries
Christine Koetting, Associate Vice President of Accounting
Virzola Law, Mission Specialist, NBA XPLOR
April Lewton, Vice President of Development and Marketing
Larry J. Morris III, Program Associate, NBA Incubate Initiative
Bonnie Osei-Frimpong, Director of NBA XPLOR
Kara Whitehouse, Executive Support Manager
Angela Whitenhill, Mental Health Initiative Manager
Kasi Zieminski, Director of Marketing
Gary Zimmerman, Vice President for Administration and CFO

 

GA-1908

GA-1908

DIVISION OF HOMELAND MINISTRIES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) dba
DISCIPLES HOME MISSIONS
Sotello V. Long, President
1099 North Meridian Street, Suite 700
P O Box 1986
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204-1036
Telephone: (317) 635-3100
Web site: www.discipleshomemissions.org
e-mail: mail@dhm.disciples.org

DISCIPLES HOME MISSIONS
2018 President’s Report
to the General Board
Submitted: January 2, 2019

Download PDF

Disciples Home Missions (DHM) is a collective of ministries designed to equip Disciples for Christ, facilitate the ministry of Christ and connect people to the life-changing love of God in relationship with its partners. Our top priority is supporting congregations and their leaders who have discerned their need to transform congregational life and find their future by:

  1. Identifying congregations and their leaders who are committed to the care of creation and assist them to become Green Chalice congregations in partnership with Eco America and Blessed Tomorrow.
  2. Partnering with Family and Children’s Ministries, Youth Ministries, Young Adult Ministries, and the Racial Ethnic Ministries in faith formation and leader development.
  3. Providing consulting services to congregations through our Ministry of Evangelism, Congregational Transformation, and Black Ministries in conjunction with Hope Partnership for Missional Transformation.
  4. Continuing to work with the National Benevolent Association toward the development of a Disciples Exchange Network, incubating new ministries, and supporting NBA’s XPLOR program for young adults in intentional community.
  5. Offering opportunities for Disciples across the United States and Canada to participate in mission trips to help rebuild churches and homes in the aftermath of natural or human-made disasters and to work on special projects in between disasters, i.e. Disciples Volunteering and Church of the Brethren Disaster Services for Children.
  6. Providing resources for congregational leaders – pastors, elders, deacons, teachers, etc. – to strengthen faith, inspire excellence in ministry and congregational leadership, and inform them through social and print accessible media of the various ministries of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), i.e. YouTube, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter, bi-weekly Constant Contact correspondence, thrice yearly Disciples’ Advocate publications, Week of the Laity, Black History Month, Advent and Lenten Devotional Series, etc.
  7. Continue to explore the possibilities of greater collaboration and partnership in our work, mission, and ministry with the Executive Committees of Overseas Ministries/Global Missions, the Council on Christian Unity, and Disciples Women.

We are integrally designed to further the priorities of the church in becoming a pro-reconciling/anti-racist church; the formation of 1,000 new congregations by 2020; the transformation of 1,000 current congregations by 2020; and the leadership development necessary to realize these new and renewed congregations.

Becoming a Pro-Reconciling/Anti-Racist Church

DHM has established a Pro-Reconciliation and Anti-Racism (PRAR) Team comprised of staff and board members engaged in its transformational journey as a vital part of its commitment to becoming a pro-reconciling/anti-racist church. The team leads DHM in a 6 year cycle resourcing the whole board and staff in training, readings, community building, group outing experiences; assessments and recommendations aimed at transforming the culture and relationships of DHM among its myriad of ministries. The team has outlined the new cycle of readings for 2019 with two books – Lies My Teacher Told Me and Anxious to Talk About It: Helping White Christians Talk Faithfully about Racism. The team has arranged to have Dr. Carolyn Browning Helsel, Assistant Professor of Homiletics at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Austin, Texas and the author of Anxious to Talk About It… as our November 13, 2019 PRAR Training facilitator.

DHM’s board participated in a cultural bus tour of Saint Louis, MO & dinner at Sweetie Pies as a part of its May meeting. The bus tour went through several communities of St. Louis shed light on the back-story of the certain communities and the historic racism that has influenced their evolution. It was educational and informative. We are thankful to our board member, Pastor Derrick Perkins, of Centennial Christian Church for coordinating the tour.

The Formation of 1,000 New Congregations by 2020

DHM is a collegial partner in the formation of new congregations through its Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation led by R Wayne Calhoun, Sr.; the Leadership Initiative Team (LIT) with its ministry liaison, Lonnie Graves; and collaborations with New Church Ministry.

The Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation is charged with the responsibility of empowering local Disciples congregations to move into their vision and mission. The ultimate goal of this office is to engage Pastors, congregational leaders and congregational participants individually and collectively to seek effective methods of evangelism as well as striving to be transformative communities of faith in their ministries of context. This office is committed to engaging and helping local congregations accomplish these tasks by employing the following strategies:

  • Resourcing the development and implementation of evangelism and church growth strategies utilizing forums such as the School of Life and Faith at the Biennial Session of the National Convocation.
  • Aiding the development and implementation of evangelism and church growth strategies utilizing the School of Life and Faith at state/regional conventions, convocations and fellowships.
  • Working to develop and continue the enhancement of skills in congregational evangelism, church growth and transformation strategies through congregational interventions.

The Office of Evangelism is networked with Evangelism Connections, which is an ecumenical group of Christians who strive to frame evangelism, hospitality, and church vitality wisdom and witness in a 21-st Century context and provide shared resources toward that end. These colleagues from partner denominations are representative of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, American Baptist Church, Church of the Brethren, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Presbyterian Church of Canada, Presbyterian Church in the USA, the Reformed Church in America, the United Church of Christ, the United Church of Canada, the United Methodist Church, as well as other interested observers.

Evangelism Connections met at the Disciples Center on October 24 hosted by our Office of Evangelism. Plans are in the making for a US and Canadian evangelistic conference in May of 2019 in Minneapolis, MN.

The Leadership Initiative Team began as new ministry initiative simply called “LIT!” LIT is convened by Disciples Home Missions and involves a collaboration of leaders in the service of leader development around any focus of ministry. The concept of this initiative is to design leader development around issues pertinent to the body’s (congregation’s/region’s/ district’s/area’s/fellowship group’s/etc.) ministry context. If your ministry needs resources or help designing resources for leader development around evangelism, social justice; men’s ministry; women’s ministry; youth ministry – you name the interest, then LIT is available to help.

LIT designs ministry from the ground up starting with listening to you, the active leaders who are engaged in the ministries, of the Regions, Districts, Fellowship communities, and Congregations among other recognized bodies. LIT listens with intentionality, to hear how and where God is moving in your ministry context. LIT listens to hear your needs and help identify what helpful resources may be needed to help your ministries be more successful. LIT also listens with an openness to receive the leading of God’s Spirit in response to prayer, dialogue and the expectations of your ministry context. LIT uses the collective resources, connections, skills and mutual wisdom of its networks in accompaniment with “you” to design contextual ministry resources. These resources may either be the “Do-It-Yourself” (DIY) kind such as especially designed curricula, and targeted resource tools that are facilitated by you, or be collaborative, where you incorporate the gifts of a facilitator, drawing from a member, or members of DHM’s LIT “Speakers Bureau”.

We are invested, optimistic, and enthusiastic about the “LIT” team convened by Disciples Home Missions (DHM) as a part of its leadership initiative. It is a commitment to living into “accompaniment leadership” as a focal point. The plan is simple, yet profound. We have convened a network of diverse persons who excel, and have passion within certain areas of leadership.  We gather those in Christ’s service, who are “lit” (excel and have passion) around evangelism, women, men, youth, young adults, clergy, technology, social justice, etc. DHM seeks to build relationships among networks through dialogue, as we work toward developing mutual understandings of each member’s passion for ministry. DHM and the Leadership Initiative Team (LIT) will work collectively to engage communities in the service of the church as followers of Jesus Christ, supporting positive leadership growth within the church and as we share our services in the larger communities… even unto the ends of the earth.

The goal of LIT is to provide support, resources and speakers to compliment the training and development of Disciples leaders throughout the recognized organizations of the church: Regions, Districts, Fellowships and/or congregations among other bodies!

The objectives of LIT are to:

– Listen to leaders of recognized ministries
– Listen in community with connected partners for mutual understanding regarding your ministry context
– Listen to God’s Spirit in initiating and/or responding to God’s activity in your ministry context
– Design resources fit for a specific ministry context
– Share collective resources for leader development

With respect to the formation of new congregations LIT is in partnership with Terrell McTyer, Minister for New Church Strategies, as a part of the team.

Collaborations with new church ministry involved two direct partnerships as DHM President. First, I had the privilege to participate in addressing participants at the Leadership Academy (LA) in Indianapolis September 17 – 21 at Westview Christian Church. The LA is a leadership event that brings together leaders from across the nation to share leadership experience, wisdom, and trainings. The conference is a five-day event hosted Hope Partnership for Missional Transformation of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

I also had the privilege to participate in the New Church Hacks series sponsored by New Church Ministry of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) through Hope Partnership for Missional Transformation on December 12 via “Webinar Jam”. Specifically, I addressed the audience to inspire leaders to discover their personal, spiritual and church’s purpose.

Hosted by Pastor Terrell L McTyer, Minister of New Church Strategies, New Church Hacks (NCH) provides practical (and sometimes peculiar) prompts for churches from start to restart. Why only do new or better when you can be both! NCH is jam packed with clever solutions to tricky problems and empowers courageous leaders with the tools, tips and how to start, sustain and strengthen congregations. #churchlife

The topic for the installment was Find Your Church’s Purpose with these Hacks. Here is the description:

What purpose does your church serve in your local neighborhood? A purpose statement is different from a vision or mission statement. Purpose answers the question, “Why does my church existence?”

  • Understand the difference between purpose, mission and vision
[Purpose answers why; mission answers what; vision answers aspiration/hope/expectation]
  • Discover who you are and your divine destination
  • Engage a purpose for your church that brings meaning, momentum, fruit, and growth
  • Realize the power that comes when your church is united behind passion and purpose

NCH brings you must-have hacks to develop a purpose-driven church.

The featured guests included Jose Martinez of Multi Nation Christian Church, Kansas City, MO and Amy Shoemaker, Senior Minister, Broadway Church, Kansas City, MO with a special appearance by the President of Disciples Home Missions.

The Transformation of 1,000 Current Congregations by 2020 and the Commensurate Leadership development

DHM is at the heart of congregational transformation and leader development. It does so not only through the aforementioned ministries of Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation and the Leadership Development Team but also engaging a diversity of focuses missions. These include Agencies Serving Youth, the Association of Disciple Musicians, The Office of Black Ministries (OBM), Christian Education, Christian Vocations – (Pastors, Chaplains, Specialized Ministers – All clergy), Disciples Men, Disciples Volunteering, Disciples Women (DW), Evangelism, Family & Children’s Ministries, Green Chalice, Mission Centers & Legacy Ministries including

All Peoples Christian Center, Los Angeles, CA www.allpeoplescc.org/
Inman Christian Mission Center, San Antonio, TX www.inmancenter.org/
Kansas Christian Home, Newton, KS www.kschristianhome.org
Kentucky Appalachian Ministries now evolved into Disciples Appalachian Scholarship Ministries. www.kentuckyappalachianministry.com
Southwest Good Samaritan Ministries Los Fresnos, TX www.swgsm.org
Urban Spirit Louisville, KY www.urbanspirit.org
Yakama Christian Mission White Swan, WA www.yakamamission.org

Refugee and Immigration Ministries, Immigration Legal Counsel, Disciples Farm Worker Ministry, Scholarship Opportunities, the Young Adult Commission (YAC), and the General Youth Council (GYC).

I will share the reports of three of these ministries spotlighting their engagement: Disciples Immigration Legal Counsel, Disciples Volunteering, and Refugee and Immigration Ministries.

Disciples Immigration Legal Counsel – Tana Liu Beers

Immigration policy and practice are changing at a furious pace these days. Here are some highlights from my recent work. … Peace, Tana

 Numbers for April – September 2018

New cases opened: 52      Total open cases: 63

Regions served: 19

Arizona, Pacific Southwest, Southwest, Indiana, Kansas City, Northern California/Nevada, Florida, Kentucky, Illinois-Wisconsin, Northwest, Canada, West Virginia, Capital Area, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Alabama-Northwest Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Central Rocky Mountain

Countries of origin of clients: 23

Mexico, Colombia, Canada, Sierra Leone, Guatemala, Haiti, Iran, South Korea, El Salvador, Honduras, Western Samoa, Dominican Republic, Germany, Cameron, Venezuela, Myanmar, Malaysia, Slovakia, South Africa, Liberia, China, India, Cuba

The “Invisible Wall”

In recent months US Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency with which I interact most frequently, has officially changed its mission from serving immigrants to keeping immigrants out. New policies and regulatory changes create an “invisible wall” by torpedoing the process of legal immigration. They cause delays and stress for our students and pastors trying to change their status or get work permits.

It is a constant effort to keep up with the barrage of policy changes affecting my clients in particular and our congregations more broadly. I have reviewed my full caseload and contacted clients individually to inform them about recent policy memos and to make contingency plans for their cases.

Consultations

With the rapidly-changing policies of this administration, consultations are an important service for immigrants seeking to understand their situations. Salvadorans and Haitians facing the end of TPS are seeking screening for other immigration options. DACA youth are seeking help with renewals and understanding the effects of recent court decisions.

Travel

This summer I traveled to Asamblea Hispana y Bilingue and NAPAD Convocation. As always, these are valuable points of connection with the groups. I serve most directly as well as other ministries. I also had the joy of meeting several clients and their families in person for the first time, some of whom I have represented for years over the phone and email.

Community Education

Immigration Legal Counsel has a new twitter handle @DOCImmigration, which I have begun using to get the word out about Immigration happenings. Facebook is still my primary means of providing immigration updates to Disciples.

The family separation crisis on the U. S. – Mexico border has been a travesty, but it has also been an opportunity to educated Disciples about the longstanding family detention and deportation system. I collaborated with Disciples Seminary Foundation, the Arizona Region, the Illinois-Wisconsin Region, Reconciliation Ministries, and Week of Compassion to provide written pieces, webinars, and teleconferences about current immigration issues.

Disciples Volunteering

Disciples Volunteering connects, supports, and equips Disciples serving in mission. This work is carried out in three ways: Sending Teams in Mission, Shaping Servant Leaders, and Supporting Local Missions. At the core of this work are three faith values: learning, serving, and growing relationships. As Disciples, we are students, learning through action and reflection, striving to deepen our faith by living it with others. In serving, we model ourselves after the one who came not to be served but to serve, giving and receiving in humility, and expecting the gifts of each one. Through community, we connect our faith and our lives with others, with deference for those with whom we serve, growing together in faith. Disciples Serving Community move from volunteer to servant to neighbor to friend, as we get dirty for Jesus together.

Sending Teams in Mission

One area of focus for Disciples Volunteering is supporting disaster response and recovery. Disciples Volunteering responds to disasters in partnership with Week of Compassion, Regions, and local congregations (as well as ecumenical, interfaith, other NGO, and government partners) with a particular focus on long-term recovery and the recruitment, when appropriate, of mission teams for providing labor in service with hose affected by the disaster.

Disciples Volunteering is currently supporting fully operational mission responses in several communities. A Mission Station has been operational with First Christian Church, Texas City, TX, since the start of the year with commitments to enable service opportunities throughout 2019. The summer schedule ran near capacity and next summer is already beginning to fill in. Mission teams coordinated by long-term volunteers in partnership with the local long-term recovery group are enabling case managed work and the matching of resources to see the work through as homes are rebuilt across Galveston County. In March, Disciples Volunteering also supported work at First Christian Church, Port Arthur; plans are being laid for a similar repair blitz at Iglesia Cristiana Bethania in Corpus Christi in the spring of 2019. Several summer weeks were an exciting new partnership with Reach Beyond Mission.

Mission opportunities are also available in Puerto Rico and Disciples Volunteering is excited to have the first group go there in December; the first six months of 2019 are beginning to fill in as well. This collaborative response, called Program Edifiquemos, includes Week of Compassion, Global Ministries, and the Iglesia Cristiana (Discipulos de Cristo) in Puerto Rico (ICDCPR). Through Disciples’ membership with National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (National VOAD), Program Director Jose Molina Resto is able to access up to $5,000 worth of building materials from FEMA for every home Disciples work on; since July 8, homes have already been repaired utilizing local volunteers.

The Disaster Recovery Support Initiative (DRSI), a cooperative effort with Week of Compassion and the disaster ministries of the Church of the Brethren and the United Church of Christ, enabled Disciples Volunteering to engage two specialists, Rachel Larratt and Tim Sheaffer, to support communities affected by disaster. There was a particular and acute need for this service in the U. S. Virgin Islands, where the recovery has now advanced to the stage where local leaders are ready to coordinate and receive mission groups. At the close of that response, the DRSI partners chose to renew Rachel’s contract and continue to serve with a particular emphasis on early community engagement, resourcing, and support.

Disciples Volunteering is also calling for servant mission teams to aid in the recovery of communities impacted by flooding in Missouri and West Virginia and by hurricanes in Daytona, Florida, where folks are referred through First Christian Church, Daytona. Work with congregations on Iowa and North Carolina continues through the early stages of recovery, including the possibility of partnering with International Orthodox Christian Charities to support muck and gut work in North Carolina. In addition, Disciples Volunteering supports a growing network of Disciples-based mission sites. Ridglea Christian Church, Fort Worth, TX and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Pacific Grove, CA are the most recent congregations hosting mission teams for service and learning; the addition of a partner site in Indianapolis is under exploration. Disciples Volunteering has been in contact with the local Missions Planning Team for the 2019 General Assembly and that work is progressing well.

Shaping Servant Leaders

Building on the strength of relations with United Church of Christ and Church of the Brethren colleagues, Disciples Volunteering co-led the third joint servant leadership-training event in April. Participants are prepared to serve as long-term volunteers and mission station managers after a disaster. Training together provides for richer, deeper, and broader experience, equipping new leaders to support missions with each of the participating denominations. In an effort to expand the reach of long-term volunteers, Disciples Volunteering continues to encourage and equip these servant leaders to identify, resource, and support other missions that are developing within their local and regional settings.

The Summer Mission Intern program also continues to evolve. Along with Deb Conrad, Summer Mission Intern Coordinator, this year’s training was co-led by former intern, Whitney Waller-Cole. Five interns were initially matched with placement sites; unfortunately, in the time leading up to training two withdrew. The training is being broadened for next summer to include mission interns as well as young adults who serve in congregational intern settings (if you know churches with such positions please let us know).

Supporting Local Missions

Because answering the call to serve begins at home, Disciples Volunteering is making strides toward a broader effort of supporting, connecting and resourcing those missions and ministries as they exist or are emerging from congregations and regions/areas. A variety of resources are also being collected, ranging from basic information about serving to specifics such as planning a mission trip and how best to serve after a disaster. Disciples Volunteering continues to support the disaster recovery network in the Pacific Southwest Region, which is now focusing on disaster preparedness and in late October [co-led] an organizational event with the Christian Church in Oregon and Southwest Idaho. Other local missions support has already been mentioned above, for example, working with congregations that are hosting mission teams for service and learning opportunities. Disaster response also provides an opportunity for supporting locally led missions as church members are educated and resourced for engaging in long-term recovery within their own community.

I am grateful, as always, to the Board of Disciples Home Missions and the Committee for Week of Compassion for your support in this ministry that we share.

Josh Baird, Director, Disciples Volunteering

Disciples Refugee & Immigration Ministries

 Responding with Hope Amid Threats & Challenges

 Racial and ethnic exclusion, religious discrimination, and efforts to criminalize, prosecute, and put immigrants into prison and detention have surfaced in US immigration policies and laws at various points throughout U. S. history. Yet in recent months, deep and new threats have emerged which further induce fear among refugee and immigrant communities, and threaten our nation’s values of welcome. In these times, Disciples Refugee & Immigration Ministries, a ministry of Disciples Home Missions, continues to work with churches to offer hope and hospitality. Recent highlights include:

Historically, the U. S. has resettled an average of 85,000 refugees per year – until 9/17, when the U. S. named its lowest goal number of refugees since beginning resettlement in 1980: 45,000. In the end, the U. S. resettled only 22,941 refugees in FY 2018, less than half its goal. In response:

  • Disciples RIM, with funding from Week of Compassion, and working with the General Minister and President, led a #Pray4Refugees campaign in Aug. thru Sept. In the campaign, the GMP, Regional Ministers, and Pastors encouraged Congress to resettle at least 75,000 refugees for FY2019. See all 16 videos at http://bit.ly/2PuXb8N, including the amazing story of Disciples Governor Ray of Iowa, who helped welcome 10,000 refugees to the state, inspired by his faith! Sadly, in Sept. the U. S. named a historically low goal, of only 30,000, for FY2019.
  • Disciples led in multiple White House vigils and Congressional visits near World Refugee Day and throughout the summer, and got free publicity with a shout out by Trevor Noah in October!
  • RIM invited Disciples to share stories of refugee welcome on Refugee & Immigrant Welcome Sunday, celebrated this year on June 17th, the Sunday nearest World Refugee Day (6?20). See multiple worship and story materials at: http://bit.ly/2AgLBC
  • Disciples are continuing to urge congress to hold the administration accountable to resettle the full goal number of its 30,000 refugees this year! Go to: http://bit.ly/H2xuDr0 to help!
  • Decisions are soon to come regarding cuts to funding for refugee resettlement agencies that could greatly dismantle US refugee resettlement structure. Our response in needed!

Immigrant and Asylee Restrictions and Growing Enforcement

In April 2018, the administration unveiled its intent to enact immigration laws in the most extreme way by “Zero Tolerance” which separated immigrant children from their parents at the border and charged parents with unlawful entry or unlawful re-entry. Despite an EO that claimed to end separations on June 20, hundreds are yet separated, key parts of “zero tolerance” remain, and families are now held in longer term, more restrictive detention. With more enforcement at the border and interior, and restrictions in child/family and asylee protections, Disciples RIM:

  • Spoke at multiple national actions in Congress, outside the White House, and at DHS to share faith values of family and compassion, lead prayers, and support congregations.
  • Compiled response resources to help connect Disciples with Families Belong Together and other national actions to help separated families.
  • Led together with the GMP and Week of Compassion a letter against family separation that was signed by early 3,000 Disciples.
  • Worked with partners like the Interfaith Immigration Coalition, Women’s Refugee Commission, and Defund Hate to seek to reduce enforcement funding
  • Chairs the DC Sanctuary Congregation Cluster to support asylee families, and works to link congregations to help asylee families, through RIM WRAP alerts.

Loss of Protections or TPS/DED, DACA, Farmworkers, Refugees & Others

Protections have been systematically removed since our last report for 300,000+ persons with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and 4000 Liberians with Deferred Enforced Departure (DED)> Also previous refugees stateless persons, Farmworkers, & Dreamers remain at risk and seeking protection. Amid these, RIM:

  • Continues to work with TPS led partners (such as the National TPS Alliance and Alianza Americas) to support a national solution for these TPS recipient country numbers scheduled to lose status by dates below unless there is a fix: Sudan/1,040 by 11/2/18, Nicaragua/2,550 by 1/5/19, Nepal/8,950 by 6/24/19, Haiti/46,000 by 7/22/19, El Salvador/195,000 by 9/9/19, Honduras/57,000 by 1/5/20. An Oct. 4 court injunction gives reprieve for persons from El Salvador, Haiti, and Sudan, as RIM continues to engage in advocacy to support other protections, and a national solution for all groups.
  • Works with our Disciples Liberian congregation in Maryland to strengthen their national leadership to develop a solution for 4,000 Liberians for whom DED status will end on 3/31/19.
  • Partners with dreamer led organizations such as the United We Dream to support legislative protections for dreamers, and encourage congregations to build relationships of support with dreamers in their areas. RIM also offers support for NAKASEC (Korean dreamers), who RIM invited to present at NAPAD’s [Convocation]
  • Working with additional populations now targeted by ICE for removal, despite no criminal records; including hundreds of stateless, previously enslaved Mauritanians now living in Columbus, Ohio. In addition, 16,000 Southeast Asians who entered as refugees are also being targeted, and RIM’s Director serves on a national board of SEARAC to help support protections for these populations.
  • Leads Disciples in connecting with farmworkers, through our partnerships with National Farm Worker Ministries, where RIM’s Director serves on NFWM’s board. In recent months, key partnerships for our congregations include our ongoing boycott of Wendy’s until it signs the Fair Food Program (to support tomato farmworkers with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers), 2)  sharing of Managers’ Letters with Starbucks to urge awareness of their milk (sold as “Lucerne”) purchased from 400 Darigold dairy farms in the Northwest where farmworkers have died and experienced worker abuses, and 3)  requested to WAWA and 7-11 store managers to remove “VUSE” electronic cigarettes from their shelves, as sales support Reynolds related tobacco farms where workers are not allowed to organize for better wages and safety.

Rule Changes That Need Our Help for Children and Families

The administration is seeking to change myriad federal regulations; resulting in the removal of vast opportunities for many to enter the country legally, adjust status, and receive protections. Comments [were retrieved] on two issues of Flores protections and Public Charge.

Disciples Border Evaluations & Actions

In the face of family separations, migrant needs, and border discussions, RIM:

  • Encouraged Disciples from various locations who participated in three border trips during Aug-Oct: including El Paso, Tucson, and Brownsville areas. 

Partnership Building/Resources:

  • RIM participated in a national Disciples Justice gathering held in the Upper Midwest Region, and provided training for Disciples Reconciliation Ministries to strengthen partnerships.
  • RIM regularly produces “Holy Days & Holidays” resources, & compiles other video resources, which can be found at: http://bit.ly/llCHolDays
  • RIM continues to develop models for Immigrant Welcome Congregations.

Connect with Rev. Dr. Sharon Stanley Rea, Disciples Refugee and Immigration Ministries

sstanley@dhm.disciples.org  |  @StanleyRea on Twitter  |  And http://bit.ly/RIMFacebook

One or two significant challenges faced by our ministry:
  1. Gathering our collective wisdom and implementing effective initiatives around ministry fund development. DHM needs to form and effective development arm for its collaborative ministries.
  2. Doing as much or more with less. DHM models tapping into the resourcefulness of collaboration and partnering with ministries aligned with our diversity of missions.

A few bright spots on the horizon are:

  1. The Leadership Initiative Team (LIT) is a ministry birthed in response to the call “to keep from becoming ‘deaf’ to the cries for help emanating from congregational life, responding to those cries with a spirit of compassion and accompaniment.”
  2. The collaboration of several general ministries and regional ministries in the financial and collegial support of our Immigration Legal Counsel!
  3. Continuing relationship with Blessed Tomorrow allowing the Disciples an integral and impactful voice in creation care and climate change initiatives.
  4. Two new Mission Centers aligned with The National Youth Event for both Disciples of Christ and the United Church of Christ youth.
  5. The Rest & Renewal Policy for Ministry Associates allowed two weeks of R&R in 2018 for Kelly Harris and Kathy Watts.
  6. Sheila Spencer rejuvenated in a 3-month sabbatical in 2018 and sabbaticals for Olivia Updegrove, Sharon Stanley Rea and Lonna Owens are in process for 2019.
  7. Our continued sharing of financial services with Overseas Ministries/Global Missions.
  8. Our School of Faith and Life is an annual opportunity for leader development and we are exploring way to expand its outreach in cluster, regional, district other advantageous ministry contexts.
  9. The establishment of a new scholarship aimed at students of Appalachia trough the Disciples Appalachian Scholarship Ministry.
  10. The Call of a dynamic duo in offering leadership with Disciples Men in the persons of Greg Alexander, former General Minister and President of the Christian Church in Kentucky and Alex Ruth, the pastor of Marshfield Christian Church, Marshfield, MO
  11. The initiative of “Ministries Across Generations” (MAG) in convening voices from across the denomination and a diversity of racial ethnic expressions for equipping in contextual intergenerational ministry.
  12. The transformational impact of our PRAR team on DHM’s ministry as a whole in living into becoming a pro-reconciling and antiracist general ministry.

Let me end my remarks with a story. A Disciples pastor had the audacity to obey the leading of God’s Spirit to go to a community gym and get the attention of a teenager playing a pick-up game of basketball. He called aside the teenager off the basketball court. The pastor invited the teenager to have a seat with him on a couch in the hallway. The pastor came straight out with it as he told the teenager, “I believe you’re gonna be a preacher!” The teenager looked steely eyed and unmoved on the outside. Oh, but on the inside he wondered how the heck did the pastor knew his secret? The teenager had indeed been in the midst of having imaginations, experiences and an inward witness of God’s call rooted in the stories of Jesus that resonated deep within his longing heart but he kept them at arm’s length. Instead the teenager occupied himself with excelling in school and competing in athletics, but not ministry, because he just knew he was not ready. He knew he wasn’t good enough for God to use – or so he thought. The teenager nevertheless was struck to his core by the pastor’s words and kept them at heart.

Years later, another pastor prayed with that same teenager, now a young man in college, in a prayer line. As he prayed, he offered a word of prophecy, saying to the young man, “I see you leading ministries!”

Now the Disciples pastor is Colonel W Sutton, who is as of this submission, alive and well into his nineties. He was the pastor of Grove Park Christian Church in Kinston, NC. The other pastor was Mac Timberlake, now deceased, but at the time was the pastor of Christian Faith Center, a non-denominational congregation in Creedmore, NC. The teenager and subsequent young man to whom both pastors spoke a word of life is yours truly, Sotello Long. God has positioned me in this place of service not because of any perfection on my part, but because of God’s amazing grace bestowed on me when I said yes to God’s call. I am humbled to serve as President of Disciples Home Missions for the United States and Canada – our denominational “breadbasket” of ministries connecting people with the life changing love of God – transforming lives!!!!

 

MINISTER TO AGENCIES SERVING YOUTH MINISTRIES

REV. SCOTT THAYER

 The following is my report to the Department of Homeland Ministries and to the General Board of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) for the year 2018.

  • NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DISCIPLES SCOUTERS – An information letter went out by mail in February to all current and prospective members of the National Association, informing them of events and activities and also soliciting membership dues. All dues were sent to DHM for deposit. Future communication with the membership will take place electronically in the form of a quarterly newsletter that is being developed in partnership with P.R.A.Y. (Programs of Religious Activities for Youth). [See next bullet item].
  • PROSPECTIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH P.R.A.Y. – I have been in consultation with Mr. Jason Noland, Executive Director of P.R.A.Y. about working cooperatively to produce and distribute a quarterly newsletter to all Disciples Boy Scout units and adult Scout leaders. [This newsletter could also be extended to include Girl Scout adult leaders and other youth serving agencies]. Other denominational groups have already undertaken such a partnership with P.R.A.Y., to great benefit (eg., Lutherans and Baptists). P.R.A.Y. personnel would design, produce, and distribute the newsletter electronically. I would be responsible for writing informational pieces each quarter to include in the newsletter. The newsletter would promote both Disciples Scouting and the religious emblems program that is offered by P.R.A.Y. This religious emblems program is the largest and most effective of its kind. It is used by thousands of young people and their religious leaders all over the country. It is ecumenical and interfaith and can be utilized by any young person without regard to membership in Scouting. I still need confirmation that P.R.A.Y. can use the red chalice & cross logo of the Disciples of Christ. The cost of this program will be about $250 per year. I am still waiting for the national office of the Boy Scouts to release the contact information for all of our Disciples Scout leaders to P.R.A.Y.
  • DISCIPLES YOUTH SERVED BY THE P.R.A.Y. RELIGIOUS EMBLEMS PROGRAM IN 2018
    • Cub Scouts: (‘God & Me’) – 116
    • Webelos Scouts: (‘God & Family’) – 130
    • Boy Scouts (‘God & Church/God & Life’) – 99
    • Girl Scouts: 8
    • Other: 18
    • Total Youth Served:  371
  • BOY SCOUTS STATISTICS – According to national BSA statistics, 356 Cub Scout Packs, 357 Boy Scout Troops, and 53 Venturing Crews are chartered to Disciples congregations nation-wide, for a total of 17,249 youth served. 8,319 adult leaders are associated with these units. I was not able to secure similar statistics for Girl Scouts in the U.S.A. or for other youth serving agencies that might be connected with Disciples congregations.
  • NATIONAL ANNUAL MEETING, BOY SCOUTS IN THE UNITED STATES –  In May, 2018 I attended the National Annual Meeting (NAM) of the Boy Scouts in the United States in Dallas, TX. This was an extremely productive meeting at which I was able to network with other members of the National Religious Relations Committee (NRRC), P.R.A.Y. leadership, and much more. Here are some highlights:
    • New Chaplain/Chaplain Aide training and a new statement on Duty to God were approved by the NRRC
    • New national leadership is emphasizing more diversity in Scouting
    • Partnership with P.R.A.Y. and DOC was planned
    • Potential partnership with the United Church of Christ and DOC to host a combined information booth at future U.S. National Scout Jamborees
    • Discussion of a portion of national training shifting from Philmont Scout Training Center in New Mexico to the Summit Bechtel Reserve in West Virginia
    • Strategies for incorporating girls into the Cub Scout program nation wide
    • Strategies on how to proceed after the departure of the Church of Latter Day Saints as chartering partner beginning next year

WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE 24

I have been chosen to serve as a subcamp chaplain at the World Scout Jamboree (July 22-August 2, 2019) at the Bechtel Summit Reserve in West Virginia. Unfortunately this will preclude my ability to attend the 2019 DOC General Assembly in Des Moines. I will make arrangements to appoint representatives to host the Scouting booth in the DHM exhibit hall area.

GIRL SCOUTS IN THE U.S.

I have reached out to the national leadership of GSUSA in an attempt to partner with them on projects of mutual benefit. I have issued a formal invitation to the GSUSA to join with the Boy Scouts in hosting a common information booth at the 2019 DOC General Assembly. The invitation has not yet been accepted.

SCOUTS FOR EQUALITY

I have joined an organization called Scouts For Equality and now serve as a board member. The organization is dedicated to advocating that any young person who desires to be a Scout should be allowed to do so, regardless of race, physical/intellectual ability, sexual orientation/identity, religion (or no religion). It is a very progressive organization and it is an honor to be named to its board.

GOALS AND DIRECTION FOR THE FUTURE

  • Encourage DOC churches that already host Scouting units to continue and grow.
  • Recruit new DOC churches to host Scouting units, advocating to church leaders the benefits of Scouting to their congregations and communities. Occasional articles in DHM publications such as The Advocate would help to achieve this. The proposed quarterly newsletter from P.R.A.Y. will enhance communication and promotion.
  • Serve as DOC denominational representative to the P.R.A.Y. Board. Encourage more DOC youth to earn religious emblems.
  • Be actively involved with local, Area, Regional and National levels of Scouting (and other youth serving agencies when possible) to strengthen relationships between the various youth serving agencies and DOC churches.
  • Participate in the National Committee on Religious Relationships in Scouting and similar committees in the other youth serving agencies.
  • Revive The National Association of Disciples Scouts by re-constituting the membership roster and by recruiting a leadership team to start planning significant events for DOC Scouts and adult leaders.
  • Seek to raise financial support for the National Association of Disciples Scouts to pay for postage, promotion, signage and booth space.
  • Increase interest among DOC ministers and laity in becoming a chaplain at Scouting events. Offer training at national and regional church events.
  • Serve as a good-will ambassador from the Disciples church to youth serving organizations nation-wide.
  • Represent youth serving agencies at General Assembly meetings.
  • Report on youth serving agency activities, events and religious emblem achievement to the DHM Board and the General Board.
  • Interface with leaders of the Church of Christ-Disciples of Christ and with all Regional Ministers of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), informing them of events and activities of youth serving organizations in their respective jurisdictions.

This concludes my report for 2018. I remain grateful to be able to serve in this capacity and I eagerly solicit any and all suggestions from DHM board members.

 

Office of Chaplaincy and Specialized Ministry

It is both an honor and privilege to serve as the Endorsing Officer for Disciples serving in chaplaincy ministries across our denomination. I have completed just over one year of service in this position. I am thankful for and blessed by the trust and support I have received from our chaplains and from the leadership of OHM and our Church. Thank you for all that you are doing to recognize and lift up our Disciples who serve faithfully in the wide variety of chaplain ministries where they are engaged daily.

The maintenance of current ecclesiastical endorsementby a recognized faith group is a regulatory requirement for chaplains who minister in Federal settings including the Veterans Administration and all branches and components of the U.S. Military. Denominational endorsement for chaplain ministry is also a requirement for most hospital, hospice, prison, law enforcement, and workplace settings where professional chaplains are employed. It is the responsibility of the Office of Chaplaincy and Specialized Ministry to provide endorsement services as well as to recruit, support, and account for our denominationally endorsed chaplains. It is a condition of endorsement that chaplains be members of a local Disciples congregation and have ministerial standing in one of the Regions of the Church or with the General Commission on Ministry.

Where our 331 Disciples Endorsed Chaplains currentlyserve as of October, 2018:

  • U. Navy: 14 (Active Duty and Reserve)
  • S. Air Force: 15 (Active Duty, Reserve, Air National Guard)
  • S. Army: 22 (Active Duty, Reserve, Army National Guard)
  • Federal Bureau of Prisons: 2
  • Civil Air Patrol Chaplains: 1
  • Veterans Administration Chaplains: 18
  • Institutional Chaplains: 251 (hospital, hospice, retirement homes, nursing homes, state prison, fire department and law enforcement)
  • Pastoral Counselors: 8

Each one of these chaplains provides an annual report to our office with information about their current status of service, changes to personal information, continuing education, congregation and Regional activities, and an opportunity for the sharing of joys and concerns. All endorsed chaplains are also members of the Disciples Chaplains Association – an informal community of support and connection.

The Office of Chaplaincy and Specialized Ministry has been graced with the staff support of Ms. Anne Marie Moyars, our dedicated Ministry Associate for over 10 years. Anne Marie maintains current paper and electronic files on each endorsed chaplain. In addition she watches over and provides access to the online Chaplain Endorsement Application process and the Disciples Chaplains electronic information interface. Anne Marie also publishes the monthly “Disciples Chaplain Check-in” newsletter. Our chaplains and our ministry are grateful for her professional attention and support. She is the “voice” of chaplaincy for all who call seeking information.

Currently the Disciples Chaplain Endorsing Officer is a deployed program staff, quarter-time position. As such I work primarily from my home in Vancouver, Washington. have represented our Disciples Chaplains, OHM, and our Church this year by attending annual meetings of the National Conference on Ministry to the Armed Forces and the Armed Forces Chaplain Board in Washington, DC, the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education in

Atlanta, Georgia, and the Association of Professional Chaplains in Anaheim, California. I also participated in the Virginia Regional Assembly and the Northwest Regional Assembly. In addition I visited with our chaplains in North Carolina, New York, Virginia, Washington, DC, Georgia, Alabama, Nevada, California, Oregon, and Washington.  I attended the funeral of one of our Disciples Chaplains and the graduations from military chaplain training for two others who are just entering into their chosen vocations.

The Disciples Chaplains Association will be active at the Des Moines General Assembly by offering workshop sessions, an informal meal gathering, participation in Assembly Worship, and informational presentations in the OHM exhibit area.

Thank you for your continued support of our Disciples Chaplains as they serve in vital and life-changing ministries. They serve in places of armed conflict, places where trauma, death, and life-altering illness are an everyday reality, provide hope and comfort for those behind bars, and spiritual support without restriction to all who cross their paths. They covet our prayers and efforts to bolster their numbers. Many feel that they are lone voices for inclusion and affirmation in a ministry environment that isn’t always that way.

Respectfully submitted,

The Rev. Thomas A. Yates, D.Min, BCC, CH (LTC) US Army, retired Disciples Chaplain Endorsing Officer

 

Christian Vocations

The nature of ministry through the Office Of Christian Vocations is expressed mostly through areas related to Search and Call (clergy relocation), Ministers Directory (clergy credentialing), and Ministry Educational/Formation (Scholarships & Grant programs for students and credentialed clergy, & Spiritual Formation resources). Along with Ministry Associates in these areas, I strive so that those making use of our ministries have a positive experience that is ultimately fruitful for their life and vocational calling.

Within the day-to-day responsibilities of this ministry, there is much detail-oriented work, troubleshooting of complexities and needed attention to minutia. For such, I count on the three Ministry Associates of this office to offer a high degree of professionalism upon all that must be dealt with. With gratitude, I am proud to say Anne Marie Moyars, Brenda Tyler and Kelly Harris each offer significant and generous service to those who need our care.  They, each, empower our ministry to be one that is trustworthy, compassionate, just, and fair.

Each year, we evaluate systems for highest priority needed updates to improve efficiencies, create a more-helpful system for users, and incorporate new technologies. In 2018, we integrated new tools to allow for increased automation of information sharing between regions and DHM, regarding clergy credentials, status, and personal information. This facilitates a more-effective means to maintain up to date information about clergy at regional and general offices.

This year, we also worked with our vendor, Suran Systems, to identify ongoing training needs for regional staff-persons who also use the CDM+ system. As a result, Suran staff was better able to help regional staff learn and use the systems we have in place.

Regions are also increasing their use of our Ministry Position Listing tool we maintain, which allows clergy better knowledge of what positions are available.

The Well-Fed Spirit Website: www.wellfedspirit.org continues to be popular with clergy, as we are regularly hearing from them regarding their gratitude for having such a resource available. This site is unique within our denominational system in it’s offering of wellness and spiritual formation/practice resources for church leaders (clergy and lay).

Senior Regional Ministry Staff positions continue to turnover, and we have done a good job of facilitating regional search committees seeking candidate profiles, as well as clergy seeking to be considered for such.  In this process, we continue to help new regional leaders build technical and ecclesiastical capacity in areas of ministry data and clergy records, Search And Call, and policies that bind our mutual ministries in areas for the support of local clergy.

Upon request for a summary paragraph report to General Board, the following is what I provided regarding the ministry responsibilities of my office:

The ministry of the Office of Christian Vocations is primarily focused on four areas of responsibility. The first area is Search and Call; wherein we facilitate the General Ministries portion of the clergy relocation program for the denomination, and provide support to regional offices. The second area is in regard to the Ministers Directory; in this area we provide a system for an accurate recording, reporting and archiving process through which our denomination maintains the legal database of clergy and their credentials/status within our church. The third area focuses on Vocational Ministry formation. In this area we provide direct and collaborative efforts to help empower initial vocational formation, and ongoing vital ministerial capacity, for clergy and ministry-candidates. The remainder of our responsibilities include liaison and varying degrees of support to other church-related bodies, such as Association of Disciples Musicians, General Commission On Ministry, and Chaplains Endorsement Office to name a few.

Throughout all of this work, my office is committed to serve professionally and effectively, as partner and initiator, so that leaders in the Christian Church are more able to be who G_d calls us to be in this world.

-Warren Lynn

 

The Disciples Center for Public Witness
Rev. Dr. Ken Brooker Langston
Executive Director

Introduction:  The Disciples Center for Public Witness (DC4PW) is a justice advocacy ministry within the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in the United States and Canada.  Originating as a shared ministry of National City Christian Church and the Christian Church Capital Area, DC4PW is now a shared ministry of seven founding congregations and several newer partner congregations.  (We are continuing to reach out successfully to other congregations).  DC4PW has official status as a recognized organization through the Office of the General Minister and President; and our finances are handled by Disciples Home Missions, with which we enjoy an increasingly close relationship.

The mission of DC4PW is two-fold:  to use our denomination’s passion for justice and vision of true community to evaluate and influence the laws and policies that affect all of us—especially marginalized persons and communities—in the United States, Canada, and around the world; and to inform, connect, and empower Disciples and other people of faith for ecumenical and interfaith justice advocacy in the United States and Canada.  Our larger goal is to promote and help achieve the Beloved Community envisioned by Dr. King, a vision based on the Biblical promise of shalom and Jesus’ proclamation of the in-breaking reign of God.

 Overview:  This year has been a year of increased investment and further expansion in two main areas:  communications and fundraising.  With the help of consultants, contracted staff, and volunteers, we have increased our social media presence, revised our website, published weekly e-newsletters, and developed a database that better allows us to segment and communicate with our donors and grassroots advocates. Two of our contracted staff have taken fundraising courses, and the executive director has been helped on a regular basis by both a fundraising coach and an informal network of fundraisers within the denomination.

At the same time, we continue our program activities in many issue-areas, including racial justice, gender justice, worker justice, health care, mass incarceration, gun violence, domestic violence, torture (including solitary confinement), religious liberty, drone warfare, Cuba, and Palestine/Israel.  In most of these issue-areas, we work with our ecumenical, interfaith, and secular partners.  We also work with our denominational partners on racism, immigration, refugees, women and children, criminal justice reform, and care for God’s creation.

Special Programs:  Two special programs of DC4PW are the Ecumenical Poverty Initiative (EPI) and Let Justice Roll (LJR).  EPI is an anti-poverty ministry of DC4PW that is shared with the ecumenical community.  It pulls together national and local religious leaders to work on a variety of racial and economic justice issues:  exposing the negative effects of pay day lending, opposing budget cuts to programs that help people who are struggling economically, opposing the increasing debt for college students, and promoting more equal distribution of the resources available to public schools.

Let Justice Roll (LJR) is currently a virtual organization that uses its online presence and social media to inform and empower people of faith to do three things:  promote a living wage on the national level, get more involved in state campaigns that are working to increase the local minimum wage, and oppose disparities in pay between different ethnic, racial, and gender groups.  LJR’s motto is: “A job should keep you out of poverty, not in it.”

Special Projects:  In addition to our regular activities and the activities associated with EPI and LJR, there were a number of special projects in which DC4PW was involved this year.  One of these was Journey to Justice (J2J), a project in which a new pastor of African descent was given the opportunity to learn more about diverse forms of social witness by engaging in three areas of witness:  public policy advocacy, justice-oriented networking with other church leaders, and faith-based activism.

Another special project was Labor in the Pulpits.  In this project, we encouraged Disciples to invite labor leaders or people of faith involved in some form of worker justice ministry to speak in their congregations on or around Labor Day.

Still another special project was our involvement in Torture Awareness Month.  Throughout the month of June, we encouraged congregations to do three things:  give a sermon and/or host a discussion on torture; show a film about U.S. participation in torture; and hang a banner declaring opposition to torture.

Finally, we are actively engaged in Faithful Democracy, a project where we collect and distribute useful information about voter registration, voter education, and voter mobilization to regions, congregations, and faith-based groups.

We were able to accomplish the work necessary for the success of these special projects with the help of college students participating in our summer internship program.

Campaigns: DC4PW has been very involved in three major campaigns:  The Poor People’s Campaign:  A National Call to Moral Revival, where we attended planning meetings and participated in public gatherings and events in Washington, DC; the National Council of Churches’ ACT Now, which began with an event on the U.S. National Mall in which DC4PW organized and staffed a Disciples booth that received a good deal of traffic from participants in the gathering; and MLK50, where we encouraged participation by Disciples in events around the United States that were sponsored by the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, TN.

Collaboration with Disciples Home Missions (DHM):  In terms of DC4PW’s close working relationship with DHM, we worked with Refugee and Immigration Ministries and the coalition to which it belongs, the Interfaith Immigration Coalition, to oppose such things as the separation of undocumented immigrant children from their families, the tearing apart of immigrant families by our current immigration policies, the severe limiting of the number of refugees who are allowed to enter the United States, and the changes in statutory and regulatory definitions that make it even harder for immigrants legally to enter our nation.

We also worked closely with Green Chalice with and through the coalition to which we both belong, Creation Justice Ministries, on clean air and water, the preservation of national parks and monuments, the protection of the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge (ANWAR), a quicker transition away from fossil fuels, and opposition to both the Keystone Pipeline and increased offshore drilling.

And, finally, we worked with Family & Children’s Ministries with and through the coalition to which we both belong, Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence. Alongside other people of faith, we actively promoted universal background checks, the banning of assault weapons, restrictions on high capacity ammunition magazines, and making gun trafficking a federal crime.

Conferences in which DC4PW actively participated:  Ecumenical Advocacy Days for Global Peace with Justice, Black Ministers Retreat, the National Convocation, Winter Talk, the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference, Asamblea Nacional Hispana Y Bingue, the Christian Unity Gathering of the National Council of Churches, Festival of Homiletics, National Immigrant Integration Conference, MLK50 Gathering for People of Faith.

Regional Assemblies where DC4PW had a strong presence:  Canada, Florida, Tennessee, and the Christian Church Capital Area.

Coalitions with and through which DC4PW works: The Poor People’s Campaign:  A National Call for Moral Revival, Interfaith Worker Justice, National Religious Campaign Against Torture, Creation Justice Ministries, Paycheck Fairness Coalition, Coalition Against Religious Discrimination, International Religious Freedom Roundtable, Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence, Heads of  Washington Offices of the Washington Interreligious Staff Community, Washington Working Group on the International Criminal Court, Domestic Human Needs, Coalition on Human Needs, Interfaith Network on Drone Warfare, School of the Americas Watch, Medicaid Coalition, Jubilee, USA, Bread for the World, the Interfaith Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, the Interfaith Health Care Coalition, and the Committee on Religious Liberty.

Disciples Immigration Legal Counsel

Tana Liu-Beers

Immigration policy and practice are changing at a furious pace these days. Here are some highlights from my recent work.

Thanks to dedicated fundraising by Sotello Long and Cathy Myers Wirt, DHM was able to increase my hours from 20/week to 25/week beginning this February. This increase could not have come at a better time, as you’ll see below.

As always, thanks for your ongoing support. Knowing that so many of you have my back gives me strength to face the attacks on our immigrant communities and the decimation of our immigration system.

Peace,

Numbers for the Past 6 Months

New cases opened: 52

Total open cases: 63

Regions served: 19

Arizona, Pacific Southwest, Southwest, Indiana, Kansas City, North California/Nevada, Florida, Kentucky, Illinois-Wisconsin, Northwest, Canada, West Virginia, Capital Area, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Alabama-N Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Central Rocky Mountain

Countries of origin of clients: 23

Mexico, Colombia, Canada, Sierra Leone, Guatemala, Haiti, Iran, South Korea, El Salvador, Honduras, Western Samoa, Dominican Republic, Germany, Cameroon, Venezuela, Myanmar, Malaysia, Slovakia, South Africa, Liberia, China, India, Cuba

The “Invisible Wall”

In recent months U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency with which I interact most frequently, has officially changed its mission from serving immigrants to keeping immigrants out. New policies and regulatory changes create an “invisible wall” by torpedoing the processes of legal immigration. They cause delays and stress for our students and pastors trying to change their status or get work permits.

It is a constant effort to keep up with the barrage of policy changes affecting my clients in particular and our congregations more broadly. I have reviewed my full caseload and contacted clients individually to inform them about recent policy memos and to make contingency plans for their cases.

USCIS’ new policies promote denials and delays wherever possible, causing hardship for immigrants and increased workload for their attorneys. Full representation cases that used to take on average 30 hours of work time from opening to completion are now taking 50-100 hours.

Consultations

With the rapidly-changing policies of this administration, consultations are an important service for immigrants seeking to understand their situations. For example, I’ve had many calls from Cubans trying to navigate the closures at the U.S. embassy in Havana. Salvadorans and Haitians facing the end of TPS are seeking screening for other immigration options. DACA youth are seeking help with renewals and understanding the effects of recent court decisions.

Travel

This summer I traveled to Asamblea Hispana y Bilingüe and NAPAD Convocation, as well as the Committee on Week of Compassion meeting. As always these were valuable points of connection with the groups I serve most directly as well as other ministries. I also had the joy of meeting several clients and their families in person for the first time, some of whom I have represented for years over phone and email.

Community Education

Immigration Legal Counsel has a new twitter handle: @DOCImmigration, which I have begun using to get the word out about immigration happenings. Facebook is still my primary means of providing immigration updates to Disciples.

The family separation crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border has been a travesty, but it has also been an opportunity to educate Disciples about the longstanding family detention and deportation system. I collaborated with Disciples Seminary Foundation, the Arizona Region, the Illinois-Wisconsin Region, Reconciliation Ministries, and Week of Compassion to provide written pieces, webinars, and teleconferences about current immigration issues.

 

DISCIPLES WOMEN OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST)
REV. DR. PATRICIA A. DONAHOO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
1099 NORTH MERIDIAN STEET, SUITE 700
INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46204
PH: 317-713-2663
E-MAIL: PDONAHOO@DHM.DISCIPLES.ORG

Disciples Women’s Ministries is a conduit for diverse connections empowering each woman to find her voice and live out her call.                             Micah 6:8

Disciples Women are serving in ministry in various capacities. Women continue to try new ways of doing ministry and of being Disciples Women groups. Since my last report I have keynoted, preached, led workshops, marched, served with, and/or gathered in conversation with Kentucky DWM; FCC Richmond, IN; Poor Peoples’ Campaign on Capitol Hill; General Ministry Cabinet; Disciples Peace Fellowship; Governance Committee of General Board; the Summit – World Change through Faith and Justice; DHM Development Committee; Heartland Interregional; Expensify Training; Valerie Melvin Installation as Regional Minister; Obra Hispana Assembly; National Convocation; Fairhill Manor CC; NAPAD Assembly; Justice Summit; HOPE Leadership Academy; Junia Conference; Alabama-NW Florida DWM; Executive Committee; FCC Bloomington, IN; Capital Area Regional Assembly; IL/Wisconsin Regional Assembly; FCC Bloomington, IL; CTS – Grace Embodied; Great River Region Regional Assembly; and Executive Certificate in Religious Fundraising training.

We continue in close covenant with Disciples Home Missions and continue in anti-racism/pro-reconciliation efforts and training. We have a healthy partnership with HELM in sharing Lisa Hubbard as a Ministry Associate to provide full-time employment for her while handling both of our support needs.

Our Woman-to-Woman Worldwide (W2WW) program facilitates journeys to visit our global partners each year. In partnership with Global Ministries we prepare delegations for what they will encounter during journeys through study, training, and conversation. Chesla led a delegation to Cuba in October in cooperation with the Caribbean Initiative of Global Ministries. Next year the delegation will be going to Morocco followed by a journey to Southern Asia in 2020 as part of the new global ministry initiative focused there. Among other projects, last year’s delegation to India was excited and moved by the work being done to fight trafficking especially for the most vulnerable. The delegation was excited to fund a project that would provide training and support for 7-10 women to begin their own business to provide for their families and keep them safe from the dangers of poverty. $6,000 was required and has already been completed.

In in its 10th year of publication, Just Women Magazine, the designated resource for Disciples Women has begun to publish the Bible study annually. The theme for 2019 is “The Church: Mission Possible”. Given the loss of our quarterly publication we are working to find ways to continue to communicate regularly with Disciples women across the continent. Chesla and Regenia are developing a e-newsletter.

Disciples Women continues to use #DWConnect as a means of better understanding the value of shared stories, resources, and concerns. Recognizing the strength of being connected to one another helps to provide for the needs of women throughout the United States and Canada. We will also be providing finger labyrinths to General Assembly attendees to encourage the development of spiritual disciplines and will label each with the woman’s name, congregation, and location to celebrate that Disciples women are serving in ministry far and wide.

New members for the Executive Committee have been chosen to begin their terms in 2019. This will be our first time with a President-Elect and staggered terms for members. We are excited about the help this will be in continuity of leadership.

Chesla Nickelson, program director and merger staff, continues to update and improve the Leader Apprentice Program (LAP) to continue to provide leadership training for women of color. Past graduates are now serving at all levels of the Disciples church. We are currently in the process of developing a similar program that will focus on young women, middle and high school age, to include not only leadership training but also financial responsibility, and body and personal agency. Chesla is also working on new volumes of our Wisdom of Women by interviewing women leaders to capture and share their wisdom.

Disciples Women continue to contribute to the whole mission of the church through their ministries and giving. We appreciate the covenant with DHM that continues to share funding from DMF. With our current funding we are unable to do the breadth of ministry we are called to do. We continue to explore ways to improve it. We have established a legacy fund in hopes that we can inspire women to participate in the ministry by remembering Disciples Women in their estate planning as well as provide gifts to an endowment fund to support the ministry into the future. We will be celebrating our 145th ‘birthday’ in 2019 and are hoping to celebrate it by encouraging Disciples to celebrate by giving monetary gifts to the ministry.

Respectfully,

Patricia A. Donahoo

Executive Director, Disciples Women

 

Disciples Volunteering

Disciples Volunteering connects, supports, and equips Disciples serving in mission. This work is carried out in three ways: Sending Teams in Mission; Shaping Servant Leaders; and Supporting Local Missions. At the core of this work are three faith-values: learning, serving, and growing relationships. As Disciples, we are students, learning through action and reflection, striving to deepen our faith by living it with others. In serving, we model ourselves after the one who came not to be served but to serve, giving and receiving in humility, and respecting the gifts of each one. Through community, we connect our faith and our lives with others, with deference for those with whom we serve, growing together in faith. Disciples Serving Community move from volunteer to servant to neighbor to friend as we get dirty for Jesus together.

Sending Teams in Mission

One area of focus for Disciples Volunteering is supporting disaster response and recovery. Disciples Volunteering responds to disasters in partnership with Week of Compassion, Regions, and local congregations (as well as ecumenical, interfaith, other NGO, and government partners) with a particular focus on long-term recovery and the recruitment, when appropriate, of mission teams for providing labor in service with those affected by the disaster.

Disciples Volunteering is currently supporting fully operational mission responses in several communities. A Mission Station has been operational with First Christian Church, Texas City, TX, since the start of the year with commitments to enable service opportunities throughout 2019. The summer schedule ran near capacity and next summer is already beginning to fill in. Mission teams coordinated by long-term volunteers in partnership with the local long-term recovery group are enabling case managed work and the matching of resources to see the work through as homes are rebuilt across Galveston County. In March, Disciples Volunteering also supported work at First Christian Church, Port Arthur; plans are being laid for a similar repair blitz at Iglesia Cristiana Bethania in Corpus Cristi in the spring of 2019. Several summer weeks were an exciting new partnership with Reach Beyond Mission.

Mission opportunities are also available in Puerto Rico and Disciples Volunteering is excited to have the first group go there in December; the first six months of 2019 are beginning to fill in as well. This collaborative response, called Program Edifiquemos, includes Week of Compassion, Global Ministries, and the Iglesia Cristiana (Discipulos de Cristo) in Puerto Rico (ICDCPR). Through Disciples’ membership with National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (National VOAD), Program Director José Molina Resto is able to access up to $5,000 worth of building materials from FEMA for every home Disciples work on; since July, 8 homes have already been repaired utilizing local volunteers.

The Disaster Recovery Support Initiative (DRSI), a cooperative effort with Week of Compassion and the disaster ministries of the Church of the Brethren and the United Church of Christ, enabled Disciples Volunteering to engaged two specialists, Rachel Larratt and Tim Sheaffer, to support communities affected by disaster. There was a particular and acute need for this service in the U.S. Virgin Islands , where the recovery has now advanced to the stage where local leaders are ready to coordinate and receive mission groups. At the close of that response, the DRSI partners chose to renew Rachel’s contract and continue to serve with a particular emphasis on early community engagement, resourcing, and support.

Disciples Volunteering is also calling for servant mission teams to aid in the recovery of communities impacted by flooding in Missouri and West Virginia and by hurricanes in Daytona, Florida, where folks are referred through First Christian Church, Daytona. Work with congregations in Iowa and North Carolina continues through the early stages of recovery, including exploring the possibility of partnering with International Orthodox Christian Charities to support muck and gut work in North Carolina. In addition, Disciples Volunteering supports a growing network of Disciples-based mission sites. Ridglea Christian Church, Fort Worth, TX and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Pacific Grove, CA are the most recent congregations hosting mission teams for service and learning; the addition of a partner site in Indianapolis is under exploration. Disciples Volunteering has also been in contact with the Local Missions Planning Team for the 2019 General Assembly and that work is progressing well.

Shaping Servant Leaders 

Building on the strength of relations with United Church of Christ and Church of the Brethren colleagues, Disciples Volunteering co-led the third joint servant leadership training event in April. Participants are prepared to serve as long-term volunteers and mission station managers after a disaster. Training together provides for a richer, deeper, and broader experience, equipping new leaders to support missions with each of the participating denominations. In an effort to expand the reach of long-term volunteers, Disciples Volunteering continues to encourage and equip these servant leaders to identify, resource, and support other missions that are developing within their local and regional settings.

The Summer Mission Intern program also continues to evolve. Along with Deb Conrad, Summer Mission Intern Coordinator, this year’s training was co-led by former intern Whitney Waller Cole. Five interns were initially matched with placement sites; unfortunately, in the time leading up to training two withdrew. The training is being broadened for next summer to include mission interns as well as young adults who serve in congregational intern settings (if you know churches with such positions please let us know).

Supporting Local Missions

Because answering the call to serve begins at home, Disciples Volunteering is making strides toward a broader effort of supporting, connecting, and resourcing those missions and ministries as they exist or are emerging from congregations and regions/areas. A variety of resources are also being collected, ranging from basic information about serving to specifics such as planning a mission trip and how best to serve after a disaster. Disciples Volunteering continues to support the disaster recovery network in the Pacific Southwest region which is now focusing on disaster preparedness and in late October will be co-leading an organizational event with the Christian Church in Oregon and Southwest Idaho. Other local missions support has already been mentioned above, for example, working with congregations which are hosting mission teams for service and learning opportunities. Disaster response also provides an opportunity for supporting locally led missions as church members are educated and resourced for engaging in long-term recovery within their own community.

I am grateful, as always, to the Board of Disciples Home Missions and the Committee for Week of Compassion for your support in this ministry that we share,

Josh Baird
Director, Disciples Volunteering

 

Report and Updates of the Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation, Disciples Home Missions

I have two updates I would like to share with you. First, the Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation is getting ready to unveil a “new process” for accomplishing “evangelism” in local congregations in a 21st century context. We first unveiled it earlier this year at the African-American Institute of Faith and Life during the 25th Biennial Session of National Convocation this summer in Birmingham, Alabama. As the world around us has transitioned from a 20th century context to a 21st century context, the church must also come into a 21st century context. Everything that local congregations do moving forward must be transformed from a 20th century context to a 21st century context.  Helping Disciples congregations to “Reclaim the Great Commission: A New Evangelism” will be the goal and mantra of this office for the next six to seven years moving forward.

I often remember so well the excitement and feeling I had fifteen years ago when I arrived at DHM to begin a new season in my life and ministry to this community of faith I have been a part of for most of my 61 years on this earth. I remember how excited I was to be able to have the opportunity to help this church rediscover one of the core values, which propelled the Stone-Campbell Movement unto the landscape of the American frontier as it was then in 1801 with Barton Warren Stone in Kentucky at the Cane Ridge Meeting House. Now please do not misunderstand me, I am no Barton W. Stone, but the excitement he created at Cane Ridge is the same excitement I felt in August of 2003 when DHM extended me the offer to be the evangelist of this community of faith.

About two years ago, I began the process of thinking seriously about my time, work and accomplishments over the course of the last 38 years of ministry to this church I love called the Christian Church, Disciples of Christ in the United States and Canada. I thought seriously about what legacy I wanted to leave to the Christian Church, Disciples of Christ and even more important to the National Convocation. It occurred to me, that I had met, fulfilled and achieved all the requirements and expectations that my church had set before me some 38 years earlier. Now in year number 39 and moving very quickly toward year number 40, as I anticipate the last season of my ministry to this church, what legacy do I want to leave when my time and ministry come to an end.

Well! Here it is in a “nutshell”, I would like to see this church “Reclaim the Great Commission.” So, for the next six to seven years of my tenure in this office called Evangelism and Congregational Transformation, my goal will be helping Disciples congregation to Reclaim the Great Commission, and I am going to need your help and assistance. The time and season have come again that Disciples of Christ congregations need to Reclaim the Great Commission, in other words, “evangelism” will become a core value if you will, as Jesus instructed his disciples in the latter part of Chapter 28 in the Gospel of Matthew, Go! And make disciples! And baptize! And teach the world! About this Savior name Jesus who transforms lives!

Report on the third initiative of the 2020Vision/Congregational Transformation

Speaking of transforming, this brings me to the second observation I want to make in this report to you. All of you should be aware of by now that we Disciples are presently working on a vision and mission called the 2020 Vision. One of the four goals of that vision and mission, this office has direct charge of, it is called “congregational transformation.” The goal is simply this, by the year 2020, this community of faith is working on having 1,000 of our established congregations committed to being “congregation in transformation”, in other words, the ultimate goal by the year 2020 is to have at least 1,000 Disciples congregations who are intentionally and actively working on being transformational congregations. At this juncture in our journey, we have about 650 congregations in transformation.

My partners in Hope Partnership’s New Church initiative have a saying, “starting 1,000 new churches in a 1,000 different ways.” The Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation does not advocate transforming 1,000 congregations in a thousand different ways, but I do advocate and encourage Pastors, congregational leaders and congregations to seek out a transformational process they think might work best for their ministry context and work that process toward being a transformed congregation. I would also like to inform the DHM Board of Directors, that the Office of Evangelism and Congregational Transformation does offer and have in place a very effective congregational transformational process that it offers to congregations. With that said, I also need to inform you that although DHM’s CT process has worked well for many of the congregations that have engaged it, there are other effective and good processes available in the marketplace. I am not concerned whether Disciples congregations engage my office in becoming a transformed congregation, but simply that congregations engage a process to become a transformed community of faith. Here is the bottom-line, if Disciples congregations in the 21st century are going to be relevant in their mission and ministry context, they will need to be committed to a transformational process as they move into being transformational bodies in the context, which they now find themselves doing mission and ministry.

We are about a little more than a year from the year 2020 and we are approximately 350 congregations from our goal of 1,000 congregations in transformation. Therefore, my hope is that you will continue to pray with me as I continue to pray that we reach our goal of 1,000 congregations in transformation by January 1, 2021. One last point on my second observation, although the goal is 1,000 congregations in transformation, the reality is all 3,500 of our congregations in the United States and Canada need to be congregations in transformation.

As the Executive for the OECT, I felt that the DHM Board should be aware and kept informed of where the church, in general, is as it relates to the third initiative of the vision that DHM has been entrusted with leading. I hope you find this report helps to that end.

Gracefully submitted,

Rev. Dr. R. Wayne Calhoun, Sr.
Executive for Evangelism & Congregational Transformation
Merger Staff
Disciples Home Missions
Celebrating Year #16 in the Office of Evangelism & Congregational Transformation
Fifteen years ago, I was giving the honor of being called to Disciples Home Missions to be the Minister of Evangelism and Merger Staff for the National Convocation of the Christian Church. It has been a wonderful fifteen years. Come October 1st of this year I will begin my sixteenth year of service to DHM and the General Church.                                                                                                

 

Family and Children’s Ministry

Olivia Updegrove

 I have been at this “part-time” job for 5 ½ years!  Things continue to change, shift and adjust. This year included making sure the new President was aware of the connections between the multi-levels of our ministries. Connecting the dots between Families and Children (me), Youth (Randy Kuss and GYC), Young Adults (YAC), Children Worship & Wonder (Lisa Engelken), Justice responses (Kate Epperly), and what that looks like alongside our constituency groups with Ministries Across Generations in formation.  Combining the visions that were already forming with the visions of our new leader takes time, but he seems to have gotten on board and taken inclusive initiative with the Leadership Initiative Training (LIT).

Highlights:

  • Travel: End of 2017:
    • PRAR Meeting and Youth Ministry Update (both in Indianapolis);
    • NBA outreach for Hurricane Harvey Pastors retreat in AZ,
    • Black Ministers Retreat (D.C)
    • Obra Hispana Convecion (AZ)
    • Canadian Regional Assembly and Youth Encounter (Guelph)
    • CCIW Regional Assembly
    • North Carolina Regional Assembly (Greensboro)
    • Created to Be Me Camp
    • Kentucky Spring Women’s Retreat
    • Ministries Across Generations Gathering (December, 2018)
  • Ongoing: Website, Newsletters, Social Media, DHM Updates and Articles, and Critical Responses
  • Worship Planning Team for General Assembly 2019. Lisa Engelken and I have also been in conversation with Kaye Edwards (my predecessor and the creator of the “Family Spaces” at General Assembly about updating.
  • Light a Candle for Children 2018. (Check out the videos – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfHqk4jzqgxQgjzxEUxW-qOw10jZ3daXY) Sotello, Tana, Lisa, Shantha, Randy, Kate, and me all contributed to sharing our thoughts on “Realizing Our Vision for Our Children.”
  • I continue to be a part of the planning team for the Intergenerate conference. The 2nd event will be held on May 20-22 in Nashville. The first event published a book that included as article about my work with Children Worship & Wonder in corporate worship.  This conference combines scholarship and practices of the best ways to serve across generational lines.
  • Ongoing work continues to create a Children’s History of our denominations and its constituency groups.

It was not possible to continue the Disciples 5K for this third and final year.

I will be taking a sabbatical from Jan. 1 to March 31 in 2019. (Thank you, Jesus!)

 

GENERAL YOUTH COUNCIL

The General Youth Council continues to meet monthly to discuss and plan how to best engage with both and partners across the life of the denomination. Earlier this year, the group met in Indianapolis for their mid-winter retreat which provided an opportunity to discuss the councils mission, purpose and goals. GYC has identified its guiding mission and reason for existence is to help plan, implement and evaluate the total youth ministry program for the Christian Church (DOC).

There are several projects they have identified to help them live into that mission. To better connect with a wider audience, GYC now has quarterly newsletters that are available for download through the DHM website along with videos which will be created every few months as well.

The council has developed a goal of hosting annual events for youth that empowers young voices, includes leadership development and further lifts the mission of GYC. Initial plans are underway for a kickoff event to be held in 2020. More details will be revealed as they become available.

One of the challenges for the group is in recruiting new members/applications. A very much needed goal for GYC is to increase its diversity in applicants and thereby the council. They will continue to reach out to our ethic constituent groups to build authentic relationships that be mutually beneficial for all.

Finally, General Youth Council has been working with the General Assembly planning team to give shape to the 2019 youth program. We are excited that some of the old traditions will continue while bringing in some other new elements to remain relevant. Although GYC/DHM is not in charge of the program this GA cycle, they have been very involved and will continue through the duration of assembly.

Respectfully submitted,

Rev. Trayce Stewart

Green Chalice 2018

Carol Devine

 The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is a movement for wholeness in a fragmented world. Out of our call to “do justice” (Micah 6:8), we strive to demonstrate the fullness of God’s shalom through living out our faith by caring for God’s creation. From Hawaii to Ontario to Florida, and everywhere in between, Disciples’ congregations are caring for creation in unique and inspiring ways. Our mission is to connect Christian faith, spiritual practice and creation consciousness in order to demonstrate the fullness of God’s shalom.

Green Chalice is a partner ministry between Disciples Home Missions and Christian Church in Kentucky and is led by two part-time ministers, Rev. Carol Devine and Rev. Scott Hardin-Nieri. We give great thanks to Rev. Sotello Long and Rev. Greg Alexander along with the DHM and CCK Boards for their continued support and advocacy for this critical ministry.

The primary focus for Green Chalice in 2018 is to create a model for support and guidance to congregations and ministries going carbon neutral. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Midway, KY is the first congregation to actively work toward carbon neutrality.

Administrative Work Summary

  • Monthly e-newsletter, Green Chalice News
  • 153 Green Chalice Ministries (Congregations, Camps, Regional Office)

9 – Certified Green Chalice Congregations

  • Green Chalice Regional Teams in KY, OH, IN, and OR/ID, Pacific Southwest Region
  • Green Chalice Covenant – Individuals, creation care teams and congregations continue to sign.
  • Aqua-Marine Certified Chalice Congregation – Pacific Grove Christian Church has the Blue Theology Mission Station and earned the first Aqua-Marine Chalice.
  • Community Gardens –updates to the map with Disciple’s community gardens regularly.
  • Numerous phone calls, emails, meetings and workshops about creation care every month.
  • Website – updates every few months
  • Social Media – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram – new posts, almost daily.
  • Numerous Writings including: Disciples Advocate, E-publication articles, Patheos Blog
  • Eco-Challenge– Green Chalice is using the North West Institute to help support more participation in climate solutions and action. The 21-day challenge begins Oct. 3.
  • Climate Data and denominational Leaders:C. is exploring opportunities for DOC financial and property influencers to work with Climate Scientists for adaptation and mitigation behavior. Leadership would include insurance boards, pension funds, church loan officers, new church start ministers, and disaster relief leaders. Preparing a faith/spirituality track of the Climate City Expo offered in April 2019.   

Partnerships

  • Eco-Palms (ethically & sustainably grown and harvested.)
  • Carol is Chair of the Creation Care team of the Kentucky Council of Churches and helped organize a Day of Prayer and Advocacy on Climate at KY Capitol as part of the Poor People’s Campaign
  • Carol is Secretary of the Executive Board of Creation Justice Ministries and traveled to DC for the annual Board Meeting in D.C . in May and attended an interfaith reception.
  • State of Appalachia Conference with CJM, IPL, Franciscan Action Network and Creation Care Alliance (March 2018)
  • Scott attended and led a climate and faith panel at Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, NC
  • Scott partnered with Christmount for S.O.I.L. (Spiritual Opportunities for Intentional Living Conference), 2017 & 2018, looks at faith through sustainability, justice, service, and climate.
  • Scott presented how to green your church at Elders and Deacons Retreat with Leah Schade Keynoting at Christmount
  • Scott represents Disciples on the Climate Realities Project faith leader advisory team.
  • National, Religious, Partners for the Environment.
  • Interfaith Power and Light – Carol presented at “Waste Not Want Not: Helping churches go Zero Waste” (April 2018)
  • Devine helped organize and lead a G.C. Regional Meeting in KY and is working with Lex. Theological Seminary to become the first Green Chalice Seminary (Spring 2018)
  • Devine trained Disciples Peace Interns in Climate and Faith, May 2018, DHM meeting of leaders on G.C. and Carbon Neutrality, June 2018
  • Green Chalice was at the National Convocation Biennial Gathering in Birmingham, AL. G.C. established and strengthened relationships with denominational leaders. (July 2018)
  • Carbon Neutral Pilot congregations: Congregations are beginning to commit to carbon neutrality. We are still in process of creating the pathway to carbon neutrality with Midway Christian Church leading the way.

Blessed Tomorrow

  • Blessed Tomorrow National Climate and Faith Leadership Forum, Auburn Seminary, New York City, Carol and Sotello attended. (May 2018)
  • DOC Focus Groups for clergy and congregational leadersThe focus groups were conducted in Fall of 2017. Still working to draw together denominational leaders for review. Waiting for email response.
  • Continued work to improve communications
  • Work to create and distribute Carbon Neutral Guide

General Assembly 2019

  • Workshops for adults and youth, Interactive Booth in Assembly Hall.
  • Clergy Retreat in Iowa 2019

CCK Regional Assembly 2018

  • Green Chalice will have a booth in the Display Hall and Carol is leading a workshop on Carbon Neutrality.

 

Justice and Advocacy for Families and Children

  DHM Board Report 2018 by Rev. Kate Epperly D. Min.

 

I have been at this “five hour a week” ministry as Coordinator of Justice and Advocacy for Families and Children for approximately 4 years.  I continue to be delighted to be able to  resource the denomination in which I was born and raised in five primary areas:

  1. Networking with/participating in and sharing with Disciples about ongoing family and children related educational and advocacy resources/actions through the following organizations:
  • Faiths United to Prevent Gun Violence (member: Education and Communication Committee)
  • Interfaith Disability Advocacy Collaborative (affiliated with AAPD)
  • Ecumenical Advocacy Days (an annual education and advocacy event in DC)
  • Children’s Defense Fund and Samuiel DeWitt Proctor Institute
  • The National Council of Churches (Unite to End Racism Initiative)
  • Disciples Immigration and Refugee Ministries
  • The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival
  • Disciples Center for Public Witness
  • Global Ministries (Depending upon Global Ministries staff cooperation)
  • Bridge of Hope (congregation based homeless ministry)
  • Sandyhook Promise and Grandmothers Against Gun Violence (I, personally, am a member).

 

  1. Sharing out to Disciples Family and Children Justice and Advocacy resources and actions by:
  • Writing Advocate articles, writing Kids to Kids and other FCM webpage resources
  • Writing a “Disciples Justice 4 Children” blog (disciplesjustice4children.org),
  • Writing a “Disciples Justice 4 Children” Facebook Page shared out to 5+ other Disciples leadership FB pages. (In lieu of a “Constant Contact“ option.)
  • Writing occasional Tweets
  1. Two ongoing major projects:
  • Initiating the launch of an Ecumenical Children’s Advocacy Coalition through the Children’s Defense Fund (DCF) Samuel DeWitt Proctor Institute of child advocacy which recently established a multi-seminary program of academic credit for its annual summer Institute This offers a database for initiating such a coalition. My research shows that a judicatory based database for such a coalition is impossible due to the elimination of staffing designated to family and children’s justice advocacy.

I have also conferred with Sharon Watkins about launching such a coalition through/with the National Council of Churches and its Unite to End Racism initiative. However, it is too early in the life of this initiative for such action.

  • Creating an Online Intergenerational Conversation and Action Resource for Congregations on Gun Safety and Gun Violence Prevention* (the 35 page booklet is currently being formatted for online publication by Olivia Updegrove and should be available soon!)

In addition I have participated in:

  • Regular DHM staff meetings (leading opening worship twice) (via Go to Meeting)
  • DHM regular Pro-Reconciliation/Anti-Racism (PRAR) Team meetings (via Go to Meeting)
  • PRAR Annual Staff Training with CTS Dean Leah Gunning Francis (in person)
  • Ecumenical Children’s Faith Formation Conference at UCC in Cleveland (in person)
  • UCC/Disciples Global Ministries Partnership Conference at UCC in Cleveland (in person)
  • Annual Ministries Across Generations start-up meetings in Indianapolis (in person)

I look forward to new opportunities to form partnerships for justice and advocacy ministry across various Disciples regions through the new DHM LIT relational ministry approach to leadership which Sotello Long and Lonnie Graves are launching.

——————————————————-

* Finding no existing” family and child friendly” faith based resource for conversation and action about gun safety and gun violence prevention, I decided to create my own online resource. This project grew exponentially as I recognized God’s call for congregations to not only to respond to but to transform the current gun violence epidemic and our nation’s predominant culture of violence. Meeting this challenge called for my including an innovative theological approach calling faith leaders and families to explore Jesus as a non-violent “Suprahero” (above all other Superheroes). In keeping with this, is the call to take on the challenge of modeling and teaching non-violent communication and conflict resolution, and offering children and youth a wide variety of spiritual warrior/guardian disciplines such as Calmer Choice/breath prayer, Tai Chi, and Kung Fu.

Seeing Jesus as a “superhero” has been around in VBS curricula for some time, but in light of my daily care for my 6 and 8 year-old grandsons, I realized that I had to take it a few steps further by providing resources for faith leaders and families to engage in concrete ways of non-violent, spiritual empowerment in the way of Jesus.

 

Leadership Initiative Team (LIT)

Lonnie Graves, Ministry Liaison

Greetings in the matchless name of Jesus Christ,

Please receive this report from DHM’s Leadership Initiative Team.

Capable, sustainable leaders must have support, direction, training, mentors and appropriate resources to be successful.  Leaders in the ministries of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) must also be able to understand, articulate and incorporate the principles of the movement as followers of Jesus Christ, that are found in the preamble of the church.

As years, even decades have progressed regions and other entities have struggled to find the leadership tools that will allow them to thrive and grow in their ministries.  Recognizing the growing need for this type of support, DHM has been proactive in prayerfully creating a team, dedicated to spreading the news of Jesus Christ offering their ministries, callings and gifts in various ways, on the Leadership Initiative Team (LIT). Because of its unique prayer, faith and follow format; with the intention to follow where God is leading, LIT continues to be an unfolding work in program design, based on the needs of each region or group needing the LIT support.

The goal of the Leadership Initiative Team (LIT) is to provide support, resources and speakers to compliment the training and development of Disciples leaders throughout the recognized organizations of the church: Regions, Districts, Fellowships and/or congregations among other bodies!

The objectives of LIT are to:

  • Listen to leaders of recognized ministries
  • Listen in community with connected partners for mutual understanding regarding your ministry context
  • Listen to God’s Spirit in initiating and/or responding to God’s activity in your ministry context
  • Design resources fit for a specific ministry context
  • Share our collective resources for leader development

The opening and current team are:

  • Wayne Calhoun, Executive for Evangelism & Congregational Transformation Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Kate Epperly, Coordinator, Justice and Advocacy for Family and Children’s Ministries Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Lonnie Graves, Consultant Affiliation: Business Owner, Course Design/ Interpersonal Communications
  • Randy Kuss, Coordinator, Youth & Young Adult Consulting Services Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Sotello Long – President DHM
  • Warren Lynn, Executive Minister for Christian Vocations Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Lashaundra McCarty, Consultant Affiliation: Business Owner, Social Media Specialist/ Communications
  • Terrell McTyer, Minister for New Church Strategies Affiliation: Church Sustainability
  • Cathy Nichols, VP and Executive for Mission Personnel Affiliation: Division of Overseas Ministries
  • Chesla Nickelson, Program Director, Disciples Women Affiliation: IDWM
  • Sheila Spencer, Director Christian Education/Faith Formation Assistant to the President Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Olivia Bryan Updegrove, Minister of Family and Children’s Ministries Affiliation: DHM Staff
  • Richard Williams, Men’s Ministry Director Affiliation: Ray of Hope Christian Church

More information on each of the team members, their background and ministries can be found on the DHM website.  Lonnie Graves has also been asked to be the Ministry Liaison of DHM’s Leadership Initiative Team through the end of this year.  The team has met a number of times this year via conference networking.

The first request for assistance came from the Georgia Region, asking for leadership and facilitation training for their Regional Elders and Board of Directors and other leaders as they were kicking-off their LIFT Initiative.  After two plus years of research, the Georgia region finally concluded that their goals are to:

L. Love everybody
I. Inspire all generations
F. Focus on Jesus Christ
T. Transform Communities

Their five key regional strategies for the Georgia region, as they are moving forward are:

  • Evangelism
  • Clergy Health
  • Congregational Health
  • Outreach / Mission
  • Social Concerns

Lonnie Graves was able to provide facilitation training via digital media, and was the LIT representative and presenter at their region-wide kick-off event this past summer.  Graves was able to present each of the Leadership team, their ministries, contact information etc. within her presentation and to also share DHM/Leadership resources and links that will support Georgia regional ministries in the future.

As the LIT later debriefed the Georgia experience, we discussed ways of offering some of the same resources and support to other regions as we move forward as a team.  We now also have a special (generic) Power Point Presentation that reveals what LIT has to offer that can be used “as-is” or modified and added to other types of training.

Stay-tuned as the Leadership Initiative Team “grows” forward, prayerfully, in faith, listing for Gods call.

Faithfully submitted,

Lonnie Graves

 

Disciples Refugee & Immigration Ministries: Responding with Hope Amid Threats & Challenges

Sharon Stanley-Rea

Racial and ethnic exclusions, religious discrimination, and efforts to criminalize, prosecute, and put immigrants into prison and detention have surfaced in US immigration policies and laws at various points throughout U.S. history. Yet in recent months, deep and new threats have emerged which further induce fear among refugee & immigrant communities, and threaten our nation’s values of welcome. In these times, Disciples Refugee & Immigration Ministries, a ministry of Disciples Home Missions, continues to work with churches to offer hope and hospitality.

Recent highlights include:

Highest Refugee Numbers in World, but Lowest Ever U.S. Resettlement Goals

Historically, the U.S. has resettled an average of 85,000 refugees per year—until in 9/17, when the

  • named its lowest goal number of refugees since beginning resettlement in 1980; 45,000. In the end, the U.S. resettled only 22,491 refugees in FY 2018, less than half its goal. In response:
    • Disciples RIM, with funding from Week of Compassion, and working with the General Minister & President, led a #Pray4Refugees campaign in Aug. thru Sept. In the campaign, the GMP, Regional Ministers, and Pastors encouraged Congress to resettle at least 75,000 refugees for FY2019. See all 16 videos here: http://bit.ly/2PuXb8N, including the amazing story of Disciples Governor Ray of Iowa, who helped welcome 10,000 refugees to the state, inspired by his faith! Sadly, in Sept. the U.S. named a historically low resettlement goal, of only 30,000, for
    • Disciples led in multiple White House vigils and Congressional visits near World Refugee Day and throughout the summer, and got free publicity with a shoutout by Trevor Noah in October!
  • RIM invited Disciples to share stories of refugee welcome on Refugee & Immigrant Welcome Sunday, celebrated this year on June 17th, the Sunday nearest World Refugee Day (6/20). See multiple worship and story materials at: http://bit.ly/2AgLBZC
  • Disciples are continuing to urge Congress to hold the administration accountable to resettle the full goal number of its 30,000 refugees this year! Go to: http://bit.ly/2HxuDr0 to help!
  • Decisions are soon to come regarding cuts to funding for refugee resettlement agencies that could greatly dismantle US refugee resettlement structures. Our responses will be needed!

Immigrant and Asylee Restrictions and Growing Enforcement

In April 2018, the administration unveiled its intent to enact immigration laws in the most extreme way; by “Zero Tolerance” which separated immigrant children from their parents at the border and charged parents with unlawful entry or unlawful re- entry. Despite an EO that claimed to end separations on June 20th, hundreds are yet separated, key parts of “zero tolerance” remain , and families are now held in longer term, more restrictive detention. With more enforcement at the border and interior, and restrictions in child/family and asylee protections, Disciples RIM:

Loss of Protections for TPS/DED, DACA, Farmworkers, Refugees & Others

Protections have been systematically removed since our last report for 300,000+ persons with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and 4,000 Liberians with Deferred Enforced Departure (DED). Also previous refugees, stateless persons, Farmworkers, & Dreamers remain at risk and seeking protections. Amid these, RIM:

  • Continues to work with TPS led partners (such as the National TPS Alliance and Alianza Americas) to support a national solution for these TPS recipient country numbers scheduled to lose status by dates below unless there is a fix: Sudan/1,040 by 11/2/18; Nicaragua/2,550 by 1/5/19; Nepal/8,950 by 6/24/19; Haiti/46,000 by 7/22/19; El Salvador/195,000 by 9/9/19; Honduras/57,000 by 1/5/20. An Oct. 4 court injunction gives reprieve for persons from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Sudan, as RIM continues to engage in advocacy to support other protections, and a national solution for all groups.

 

Yakama Christian Mission

Report of Activities

As reported last year the Yakama Christian Mission’s top three priorities are: Build denomination wide congregational support for indigenous justice (2017 Repudiation Resolution’s Resolved #6).  Work denominationally to create a permanent Indigenous position (Resolved #3).  Develop and provide educational resources and opportunities to learn and understand the impact of the Doctrine of Discovery in all manifestations of the Church (Resolved #2 & 5). While also having a direct presence on the Yakama Reservation.  A few highlights are noted below.

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Reservation

Skate Park:  This feature is now completed.  Today work has expanded to include basketball courts as well. Important to this additional park feature is Tribal programs have lent money and power.

Universities, Colleges, and Congregations:  Groups continued to visit the reservation this year.  The two most requested areas of conversation were indigenous justice through the lenses of the Doctrine of Discovery and eco-justice.

Wilbur Memorial United Methodist Church:  At the core of this year’s work were conversations of identity.  These conversations were to help build and understanding of how the local church’s identity is based in the Doctrine of Discovery and racism.  This work is a first step toward imaging how the voice of the local church—due to its unique identity—has a distinctive story for the larger Church.

Other:
Organizing the High School Baccalaureate is a highlight of the year.

Directly related to the local work is the denominational work of anti-racism.

As normal, sad to say, the year within the reservation boundaries has experienced an abnormal (based on off-reservation statistics) number of suicides, death due to diabetes and liver disease, and car accidents.  All of which have taken time and energy.

Off Reservation / United States and Canada

Standing Rock:  The youth trip to Standing Rock—organized by Bill Spangler-Dunning and Laurie Feille of the Upper Mid-West Region—I spoke of last year occurred the first week of June.  Organized as a youth conversation on indigenous justice, youth had the occasion to speak with a number of Lakota and Dakota leaders who laid a base from which an ongoing conversation might occur.  The success of the event has led to a second trip come June of 2019.

The drive to and from Standing Rock also allowed the opportunity to begin conversations with the Flathead, Blackfeet, Crow, and Northern Cheyenne.  Congregationally (thinking of the repudiation resolution), the best opportunities to create relationship are between the Kalispell congregation and Flathead and the Billings area congregation’s and Crow.  Additionally, this drive allowed for some travel along the Missouri River—including the headwaters—which impacts the many ancient people of this particular landscape including those of Standing Rock (more thoughts on this below).

Oak Flat:  The February trip to the San Carlos Apache reservation and the Oak Flat march included travel to Laguna Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and Gila River Reservation. In each setting conversations were begun.  Each having the chance of becoming a location where Disciple congregations might begin a conversation on relationship.  On first blush, the best opportunities for relationships may be between the Gila River people and Phoenix congregations and the Laguna people and Albuquerque congregations.

The march was much like in the past.  Not an overly large group—some whom have marched since Oak Flat was first opened to potential mining.  Being present is beginning to raise a level of recognition which in turn has allowed conversations not previously possible.  A few people arrived due to YCM publicity.  All of whom do not identify as “Disciple.”

Winter Talk 2018:  Experience a good turnout which included Terri Hord Owens OGMP.  Though Chase Iron Eyes, the events keynoter, could not make it due to legal issues arising from the Standing Rock occupation, the event turned out better than hoped.  Having the opportunity to spend more time dealing directly with the Doctrine of Discovery (DOD) and its impact on the DOC, the event allowed for a re-energizing of people who have been engaged for years and created a commitment to indigenous justice work for many new to the DOD indigenous story.

This event has led to three Winter Talks coming up in 2019.  This year’s annual Winter Talk is at Tulsa, OK at Phillips Theological Seminary with Rev. Chebon Kernell keynoting.  Then the Northwest and Montana Region’s will hold their first regional Winter Talks with Sarah Augustine keynoting the Northwest and Julie Cajune keynoting Montana’s.  Conversations have begun to spread these regional Winter talks in 2020.

Landscape Mending Council:  Last year’s report spoke about Landscape Mending Council (LMC) becoming council to the Minister for Indigenous Justice of YCM, within the DHM structure. It went on to note that while the DHM Board was agreeable to the proposal, Ron Degges and the Board could not finish the foundational work to make that happen before his retirement.  As a consequence, LMC began counseling the Minister for Indigenous Justice with hopes this would be worked out in the coming year.

Good conversations were had between DHM, the Minister for Indigenous Justice and LMC during the first two-thirds of this year.  However, it became apparent to LMC that formal change was not on the near horizon. Based on that understanding LMC took two actions in this liminal time: One, LMC will continue to council YCM’s Minister for Indigenous Justice informally.  Two, LMC changed its name to the Center For Indigenous Ministries (DOC) (CIM).  CIM looks forward to a greater and closer relationship with Yakama Christian Mission and DHM, holding onto the hope that a relationship with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) will form and one day lead to recognized indigenous ministry.

In this liminal space I have begun using CIM’s people (and expertise) to broaden YCM’s impact ecumenically and tribally.  One example is YCM and Disciples were represented at the Skä·noñh—Great Law of Peace Center where discussions there about next steps concerning the Doctrine of Discovery were held.  Another example is dealing with the YCM/DOC boarding school history.  YCM and Disciples will be represented at the first national conference of National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition concerning The Spirit Survives: A National Movement Toward Healing thanks to CIM representation.  The importance of this event, I believe, is invaluable as Disciples work toward healing the unfathomable divide between Denominational and Tribal.

Ecumenical:  The one keynoted event this year was the western Methodist Women’s event, MissionU.  The event focused on indigenous justice and the Doctrine of Discovery.

Gatherings:  Alongside the gatherings listed above, conversations have begun toward creating “in-the-landscape” indigenous immersion events for young adults and pastors.  With that in mind, next June—either going to or returning from the Standing Rock event—I will visit Canadian indigenous landscape’s while following Sitting Bulls travel from Canada to Fort Buford to Fort Yates where he was killed.  On the reverse route, I will spend more time on the Missouri River (noted above) working toward some understanding of its course and ancient history.  The goal is to create a gathering in 2020 or 21 following either the Siting Bull story from Canada to Fort Yates or the Missouri River story from the head waters to Fort Yates.

Additionally, this year has seen some travel in the Bears Ears region.  No formal gathering is planned for Bears Ears this or next year, however, the goal is to be prepared to have folk present in the region, when needed, should the current administration work further to dismantle Bears Ears National Monument status.

****

Respectfully,

David B Bell
Minister for Indigenous Justice

 

Youth & Young Adult Ministry

Rev. Randy Kuss, Coordinator

  •  Consultant Support – Provided Consultant Travel Support for three YYA Ministries Leadership Events:
  • FloridaRegional Young Adult Event, January 5–7, 2018 – Lori Tapia keynoting.
  • Pacific Southwest – UNITE Youth & Young Adult Retreat – February 16–19, 2018 – Sandhya Jha keynoting.
  • DYMN 18Disciples Youth Ministry NetworkMarch 4–6, 2018 at Christmount – Dr. Andrew Root keynoting.
  • Family & Children’s Ministries Collaboration – Ministry Across Generations – Continued work with the Family & Children’s team including serving on the team working on Ministry Across Generations. Next gathering of this team is November 28–December 1, 2018 in Indianapolis. Submitted two video reflections for use in the 2018 Light a Candle for Children Prayer Vigil.
  • DYMN – Worked with Disciples Youth Ministry Network Team on the DYMN Retreat, March 4–6, 2018 at Christmount. The event drew 18 youth ministers from ten regions. Dr. Andrew Root from Luther Seminary keynoted the event with a focus on learnings from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s ministry with young people. There was also an option to stay over to attend the Progressive Youth Ministry Event at nearby Montreat Conference Center, offering DOC youth leaders two excellent events with no additional travel costs. (See PYM note). Plans are underway for the 2019 DYMN Retreat. I continue service on the DYMN planning team.
  • Progressive Youth Ministry Event – Gathered with 15 Disciples Youth Leaders attending the 2018 Progressive Youth Ministry Event at Montreat Conference Center in North Carolina, March 7–9, 2018 for networking, event updates, and sharing questions and concerns. Worked with PYM planners to share expenses for our keynoter and also to arrange an event discount for DOC registrants.
  • General Youth Council – Continuing support and work with the GYC in their mission to help plan, implement and evaluate the total youth ministry program for the Christian Church. GYC met in Indianapolis, February 16-19, 2018, and has regular monthly video conference calls. Current work includes working with the General Assembly Youth and Young Adult Team in planning for the 2019 General Assembly, exploring new approaches to increasing the diversity of the Council, and initial steps toward an event in 2020 focused on leadership development and empowering young voices.
  • Young Adult Commission – Continuing support and work with the Young Adult Commission. YAC met in Indianapolis, February16-18, 2018 and has regular conference calls. For several years, the YAC has been a rather small team. This past year the YAC expanded the team to nine members to broaden representation and strengthen effectiveness of its work. YAC is represented on and working with the General Assembly Youth and Young Adult Team toward the 2019 General Assembly. Each month from March to December of 2018 a member of the Young Adult Commission is uploading a “passion video” sharing their passion on an issue. These Passion Videos are posted on the Disciples Young Adult Commission Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/disciplesyoungadults/ and will soon be linked on the DHM page as well.
  • Young Adult Service Opportunities – Collaborated with NBA XPLOR, DHM’s Disciples Volunteering, Christmount, Disciples Peace Fellowship, and Global Ministries on development of a new promotional piece on Young Adult Service Opportunities available through the General Ministries of the Christian Church. This flyer was rolled out at the 2018 constituency gatherings and at regional events.
  • General Assembly 2019 – Serving on the General Assembly Youth and Young Adult Team and coordinating connections with GYC and YAC as all three groups work on plans for youth and young adults at the 2019 General Assembly.
  • Leadership Initiative Team – Serving on DHM’s Leadership Initiative Team as the group works to identify skills and resources and develop fresh ways DHM can listen and respond as “accompaniment leaders” to expressed needs of regions, districts, fellowships, and congregations.
  • Outdoor Ministries Connections – Connecting with leaders from regions, curriculum developers, and others on the current status of Outdoor Ministry within the Disciples and partnerships to strengthen them going forward.

 

 

 

 

GA-1712 National Benevolent Association

GA-1712

Download PDF (includes photos)

National Benevolent Association (NBA)
of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
www.nbacares.org
Mark D. Anderson, President and CEO

January 2017

Our Mission
Following God’s call, the National Benevolent Association exists to inspire and connect the people and ministries of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), to accompany one another in the creation of communities of compassion and care, and to advocate for the well-being of humanity.

Our Core Values
Serving as the Disciples health and social service general ministry for 130 years, NBA’s mission has been, and continues to be, responsive to the needs of the church and society. Over this long history, we have had the joy—and the challenge—of supporting the church across a rich array of issues. As the NBA, we are grounded in meaningful core values that focus our work:

  • Rooted in Compassionate Care: We celebrate those who have served before us in creating a just world. The NBA’s mission and work emerged from the faithful witness of a small group of Disciples women seeking to address the needs of children and families in need. We value this legacy of serving the “least of these” and endeavor to root all of our initiatives in the value and dignity of human life and in serving a world that God so loves.
  • Accountability: We claim our duty to be effective stewards of the resources entrusted to us. We are fiscally responsible and acknowledge our accountability to our partners and the communities we serve. We treat others with respect and strive to conduct our work in the spirit of transparency and openness. Where there is brokenness, we strive for reconciliation.
  • Collaborative Partnerships: We believe that meaningful results to build compassionate and caring communities happen only when we can work in partnership with God and a wide diversity of others – individuals, communities, churches and organizations. We affirm that by working with partners, as well as those we serve, and by practicing humble leadership, we have what we need to make a difference.
  • Accompaniment: We value the creative voice and mind of all people as we seek to heed God’s call, especially in the important work of developing solutions through creative and innovative efforts designed to address personal challenges and systemic oppression. As we assume a posture of openness, we find in each other’s company the “bread” that will sustain us all. As we share life’s joys and struggles, at times picking up one another’s load and going the hard way together, we create communities of compassion and care.
  • Forward Leaning: We commit to learning and adapting as we move into the future. We understand that during times of change and new directions, the path forward often involves uncertainty and challenges. Through our shared efforts of advocacy, education, pastoral response, and professional care and services, we move towards the health and well being of all.

Our Ministries and Partners
Serving as the Church’s health and social services general ministry, the NBA partners with congregations, regions, general ministries, and a variety of Disciples-related health and social service providers to create communities of compassion and care.

Our shared work advances care for and with others in our communities and raises awareness of needs that are often overlooked and forgotten—needs such as affordable housing; spiritual care for the incarcerated and returning citizens; children and family services; programs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities; care and advocacy for older adults; hunger and food security; mental health and wellness; and other needs as they emerge.

Today’s ministries of the NBA are grounded in our historic mission of “caring for the least of these.” Our missional vision is to inspire and invite people of faith into this shared work and ministry responding to God’s call to be compassionate listeners, organizers, and advocates. Together, we create communities of compassion and care. The NBA centers our shared work in three ways: Incubate, Initiate, and Connect.

 INCUBATE

The NBA incubates new ministries, empowering Disciples-led health and social service projects to focus on their growth, strengthen their impact, and plan for appropriate sustainability. Through the NBA Incubate Initiative, we support social entrepreneurs of faith as they serve their communities in a variety of innovative ways.

Impact of the Incubate Initiative

As of 2016, 10 ministries are formally affiliated with the NBA as part of the NBA Incubate Initiative. We help these entities strategically strengthen areas such as board development, capacity building, administrative mentoring, marketing and communications, fundraising and development, bookkeeping services, sustainability, Disciples relationships, and more.

In March 2016, the NBA hosted its second Incubate Retreat for 12 emerging Disciples-related health and social service ministry leaders to create intentional space for rest, renewal, and equipping for the ministry of social entrepreneurship. In September 2016, the NBA launched the SENT Seminar: Equipping Social Entrepreneurs for Leadership and Change. This educational event brought together 14 Disciples-related health and social service ministry start-ups to learn and share in a variety of topics, including leadership coaching, legal principles for faith-based entities, marketing, and fundraising. Additional virtual learning opportunities throughout the year included webinars on board development, marketing, and social media.

The NBA Incubate Initiative is also collaborating with Hope Partnership for Missional Transformation’s New Church Movement on a series of workshops for ministry entrepreneurs in discernment. “Should I Start a Church or a Nonprofit?” creates space to explore the Why?, the What?, and everything in between of starting new ministries and discerning one’s own call.

Additionally, the NBA Incubate Initiative resources emerging health and social service ministries by working with regional leadership to create regional initiatives. Starting in 2016-17, this includes a partnership with the New Church Ministries team in the Christian Church in Kentucky, specifically focusing on developing entrepreneurial skills at the intersection of congregational life and health and social service ministries.

INITIATE

The NBA initiates ministries designed to establish and grow partnerships with health and social service supporters and providers. In 2016-17, we are now in our third year of NBA XPLOR, a 10-month, faith-based residency for young adults, and we have also supported the Ferguson Justice Initiative in collaboration with other Disciples through 2015-16.

Impact of NBA XPLOR

NBA XPLOR is a prophetic movement of and for young adults who are discerning lives of care and service. The Residency provides 10-months of leadership development and vocational discernment for 21- to 30-year-olds to live simply in community and engage in direct service and justice work.

The 2015-16 cohort of 20 NBA XPLOR Residents completed more than 25,000 volunteer hours serving with 17 Disciples congregations and 24 nonprofit agencies. In 2016-17, NBA XPLOR placed 23 Residents at six host sites—North Hollywood, CA; St. Louis, MO; Hiram-Mantua, OH; Tucson/Marana, AZ; Golden Gate/Bay Area, CA; and East Dallas, TX – in partnership with 18 Disciples congregations and 27 community engagement sites.

NBA XPLOR Residents are currently working with low-income families, unhoused individuals, people with disabilities, older adults, vulnerable children, and undocumented persons, among others. They are learning grant writing, event planning, community advocacy, and much, much more. These professional and leadership skills make a huge impact. Through their dedicated work, spiritual practices, and exploration this year, these young adults are now discerning calls to social work, early childhood education, community organizing, medicine, military, ministry, and more. We look forward to continuing NBA XPLOR with a new cohort of Residents in 2017-18.

Impact of Ferguson Justice Initiative

Following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014, by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, several Disciples clergy and laypersons have joined many others in community responses for justice in Ferguson and beyond. In cooperation with other Disciples, the NBA has supported efforts for justice and racial reconciliation in the St. Louis area by promoting and facilitating conversation, gathering, advocacy, and healing. This has included: the St. Louis-Area Disciples Summit for Racial Justice in September 2015; the release of the documentary film Injustice Anywhere and supporting study guide materials in April 2016; and a Spiritual Care for Activists Retreat and evening celebration recognizing local activists, both in August 2016. The NBA has continued to engage with those involved in the Injustice Anywhere film, honoring the unnamed activists of the Ferguson Uprising and sharing mental health and healing resources with those who have been working tirelessly for justice.

CONNECT

The NBA connects service providers and mission partners—connections that empower them to learn, collaborate, and grow stronger. Our networks include approximately 40 Disciples-related health and social service ministries across the life of the church, and two Affinity Groups: Prison & Jail Ministries and Mental Health & Congregational Care.

Impact of Connect Ministries

Affinity Groups

The NBA supports collaborative communities of Disciples working together on particular health and social service justice issues. Our Affinity Group Ministries advocate for, and respond to, topics of concern across the life of the church, regularly publishing blogs, webinars, and other resources, as well as hosting virtual and in-person workshops and gatherings.

  • The Prison & Jail Ministries Affinity Group supports Disciples engaged in spiritual care and advocacy ministries with those who are or have been incarcerated and their families. The group’s work centers around inspiration, advocacy, and education. Within this network of some 350 members, we have convened a smaller peer group of 11 leaders to meet for two years, in-person and virtually, to cultivate encouragement, dialogue, spiritual renewal, and peer-to-peer learning.
  • The Mental Health & Congregational Care Affinity Group, formally launched in May 2016, supports Disciples congregations and communities engaged in spiritual care and advocacy ministries with those affected by mental illness and/or mental health disorders. The group’s four main vision areas are to counter stigma, provide resources and educational support, collaborate and connect, and encourage the sustainability of mental health ministries in congregations, regions, and the general church. This shared work supporting mental health extends to regional ministry through the 2017 launch of a new Regional Mental Health and Congregational Care initiative with the Christian Church in Georgia, providing education, support, and infrastructure development to pastors and congregations.

Disciples-Related Health and Social Service Ministries

The NBA and Disciples Home Missions (DHM) collaborate to support a rich network of ~40 Disciples-related health and social service ministries. Our goals are to connect, resource, and amplify the voices of these ministries. Through this network, ministries have access to a constellation of support and services, such as marketing and communications consulting, executive coaching, back-office accounting, and executive searches. Additional networking opportunities with ministry partners include webinars, educational trainings, and new peer groups for executive leaders and marketing/ development professionals, each group with 8-10 members who meet in-person and virtually over 18 months.

A full directory of these Disciples-related health and social service ministries follows this report.

For more information about all NBA ministries, and for stories, upcoming events, and worship and study resources, please visit www.nbacares.org.

 

DISCIPLES-RELATED HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICE MINISTRIES:

A Small Hand
Ann McBroom, Executive Director
Edinburg Christian Church
210 Center Street, PO Box 117, Edinburg, Virginia 22824-0117
(540) 933-6313
www.helpingshenandoahcountyinfantsinneed.blogspot.com

A Small Hand provides age-appropriate food, diapers, and hygiene essentials to infants in need from newborns to 36 months in the Shenandoah County of Virginia. The focus of our ministry is to serve as a specialist pantry providing care to the youngest and most vulnerable members of our community. All of our clients are enrolled in government supplemental feeding programs (SNAP/Food Stamps or WIC). As these programs were never designed to provide a full month of nutrition, families and infants often do not have enough for non-food essentials such as diapers, feeding bottles, pacifiers, and hygiene essentials. These are the gaps that A Small Hand fills. As an all-volunteer agency, A Small Hand takes pride in cost-effectiveness, professionalism and transparency. The vision and goals of A Small Hand are that children can reach their full developmental potential.

Chain Reaction Ministries
Memorial Drive Christian Church: 11750 Memorial Drive, Houston, Texas 77024
First Christian Church: 3700 N. Walker Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118
(713) 789-0060
www.chainreactionbikes.org

Chain Reaction Ministries provides freedom of transportation to those in need through a ministry of bicycle recycling. Started at Memorial Drive Christian Church in Houston, Texas, CRM recycles bicycles by linking donors with identified needs in the community. Started in December 2009, CRM had humble beginnings by answering a call by Westside Homeless Partnership for used bikes for kids in their program. The secret to CRM’s success is linking the donor with the recipient. People have an emotional attachment to their bicycles. It was their first bike, or their kid’s first bike – and they don’t simply want to set it on the curb, or donate it to a large, faceless charity. They want to know that their bike can provide the same freedom and hope to a person in need that they experienced.

 Child Saving Institute
Peg Harriott, President and CEO
4545 Dodge Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68132
(402) 553-6000
www.childsaving.org

Child Saving Institute provides a safe haven and healing for thousands of innocent young victims of family crisis, neglect and abuse. We offer the vital services necessary to make at-risk children safe and fractured families whole through programs such as early childhood education, foster care, adoption, an emergency shelter, parenting classes and therapy. Our mission is “responding to the cry of a child,” but it is our vision that guides us as we work to give the children we serve safe, happy childhoods. Our vision is that all children have homes where hope is kindled and dreams can be achieved. This is our work, and they are ALL our children.

Christian Care Communities
Keith Knapp, President
12710 Townepark Way, Suite 1000, Louisville, Kentucky 40243
(800) 662-1738
www.christiancarecommunities.org

Christian Care Communities is the oldest provider of older adult care related to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). We are Kentucky’s largest faith-based provider of housing, long-term care, adult day centers, and community based services for older adults. We serve approximately 3,000 individuals and their families throughout Kentucky. We actively work with churches helping them with older adult ministries.

Christian Church Homes (CCH)
Don Stump, President and CEO
303 Hegenberger Road, Suite 201, Oakland, California 94621
(510) 632-6712
www.cchnc.org

At Christian Church Homes (CCH) we build and manage affordable housing communities where seniors can live and thrive in the comfort of their own homes, because we believe doing so is better for communities as a whole and the seniors we serve. We are operating 58 senior communities across the country and providing high quality affordable housing for 5,500 seniors. As an organization we employ over 400 people and have a corporate balance sheet of $78 million.

Christian Services for Children in Alabama
Cynthia M. Stinson (PIP, LCSW), CEO
1792 Highway 14 East, Selma, Alabama 36702
(334) 875-0608
www.cscalabama.org

Christian Services for Children in Alabama strives to be an organization that has a positive, recognizable, long-term impact on ALL children and youth in our care by providing professional, cost-effective, and timely services. CSCA is a pioneer for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Alabama/Northwest Florida in promoting ministries that nurture, restore, and reclaim those children who have experienced various types of abuse and neglect. We provide opportunities for families and individuals (who wish) to share their love, time, and resources to nurture vulnerable children and youth toward independence and enriched lives.

Cleveland Christian Home
Charles Tuttle, CEO
1400 West 25th Street, 2nd Floor, Cleveland, Ohio 44113
(216) 671-0977
www.cchome.org

Cleveland Christian Home exists to be a haven of hope and healing for children, youth and families struggling with mental illness, abuse and neglect. Cleveland Christian Home will be a center of excellence providing the highest quality services to meet the physical, emotional, intellectual, cultural and spiritual needs of children, youth and families.

Columbia Area Older Adult Ministry
Rev. Sally A. Robinson, Chaplain
101 North Tenth Street, Columbia, Missouri 65201
(573) 819-5043

The Columbia Area Older Adult Ministry (CAOAM) provides spiritual and emotional support to the growing elderly population in long-term care and retirement communities in the Columbia, MO, area. Though this is an ecumenical ministry, it is recognized as a ministry of First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) of Columbia, MO. Currently CAOAM provides spiritual support in seven long-term care and retirement communities on a regular schedule.

Disciple Homes Management Group
Karen Wardlaw, Administrator/CEO
327 Eden Drive, Longview, Texas 75605
(903) 845-7638
www.disciplehomes.org

Disciple Homes has been providing quality affordable housing for senior adults (age 62 years or older) and their household since 1972 in Northeast Texas. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, rental assistance is available to all of our residents that qualify. Qualified residents pay 30% of their adjusted income for rent and utilities. Disciple Homes Management Group provides social services and housing to meet the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual needs of person, in the loving and caring spirit of Christ.

Florida Christian Center
Kimberly Weir, Executive Director
1115 Edgewood Avenue S., Jacksonville, Florida 32205
(904) 981-3095
www.flchristiancenter.org

The Florida Christian Center provides ministry, pastoral care, worship services, classes on faith and aging and other programs and services focused on the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of the senior and disabled residents in our community. Serving more than 300 residents in three buildings—Sundale Manor Apartments and Florida Christian Apartments provide subsidized housing for senior and disabled adults, along with Edgewood Condominiums, a senior community on-site—and with a full-time Activity Director and full-time Chaplain/Executive Director, FCC seeks to provide an array of services that honor the body, mind and spirit.

Gomer’s House
6638 North Michigan Avenue, Portland Oregon 97217
(503) 935-6362
http://www.treesdisciples.org

Gomer’s House is a faith community of healing and transformation helping people reach their God-given potential. They are safe, learning, nurturing communities where broken, battered and bruised people get help and learn new skills to overcome compulsive behaviors to become productive, functioning members of society

Hearts for Care (DRCO)
Rev. Devon McAnally, Executive Director
114 S. Independence, Enid, Oklahoma 73701
(580) 242-6131
www.drcok.org

Hearts for Care, a ministry of Disciples Retirement Community of Oklahoma, provides a single trusted source for community resources and member-defined needs. Services are offered and provided by trusted and trained volunteers and service providers who have been prescreened by Hearts for Care. Members have access to help with such things as routine household chores, grocery shopping and errands, transportation, and yard work. Hearts for Care also offers social educational, and wellness opportunities through the organized efforts of the volunteers within the community. Hearts for Care is about community, connections, and caring. It is where relationships are authentic and mutual. It is about serving each other. It is about inclusion, no matter where we live.

HER Faith Ministries
Rev. Elaine Y. Sanford, Executive Director
3396 Park Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38111
(901) 324-3705
www.herfaithministries.org

HER Faith Ministries is a 501(c)(3) Christian charity that provides assistance to homeless and needy women and children. The ministry provides emergency food, clothing, transportation, dental assistance, and housing to impoverished women and children. HER Faith also provides family counseling and programs for ministry and reading to incarcerated individuals.

Hiram Farm
Dave Lundeen, Executive Director
PO Box 157, Hiram, Ohio 44234
(330) 569-3441
www.hiramfarm.org

Hiram Farm is a nonprofit organization, agricultural setting that serves developmentally disabled adults, with an emphasis on adults on the autism spectrum. The Farm provides opportunities for these adults to grow, learn, and work in a setting focused on respect and support for individuals and the environment. Here, farmers can develop both professional and social skills and accomplish meaningful work. The program began serving six adults with autism in June 2009. Today, the Farm has grown to provide meaningful work for 24 farmers.

Juliette Fowler Communities
Sabrina Porter, President and CEO
1234 Abrams Road, Dallas, Texas 75214
(214) 827-0813
www.fowlercommunities.org

Juliette Fowler Communities is a neighborhood of choice and connection, of caring and service, of faith and fulfillment. Founded more than 120 years ago as an intergenerational community, Fowler serves children, youth and seniors, as well as their families, at our East Dallas location. As a continuing care retirement community, Fowler’s residential services and care offerings for older adults include: Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Support, Health and Rehabilitation, and Affordable Senior Housing. As an intergenerational community, Fowler’s residential offerings for children, youth and young women include: Foster-to-Adopt and The Ebby House.

Live in Hope Foundation
Martine Saint-Vil, President
425 W. Chew Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19120
(267) 736-6113
www.liveinhopefoundation.org

Live in Hope Foundation is dedicated to reducing the incidence of advanced stage breast cancer, and the rate of breast cancer deaths, among Haitian women. Our strategies include educating women on risk factors for, and signs and symptoms of, breast cancer. We promote the performance of monthly self-breast exams, and the maintenance of open lines of communication between women and their health care providers. We also provide access to mammography and physical examinations through collaboration with Haitian physicians. In addition to these services, we provide financial assistance toward treatment as well as counseling support for women already impacted by this disease.

Manistee Manor Apartment Homes
Debi Windahl, Administrator
7987 N. 53rd Avenue, Glendale, Arizona 85301
(623) 915-5039
www.manisteemanor.com

In the loving and caring spirit of Christ, Disciples House of Glendale Inc. and Manistee Manor are passionately committed to exceed the needs and expectations of our residents by providing quality senior housing and other services to enhance the lives of those we serve in a friendly family-style community environment. A place our residents are proud to call home. Manistee provides apartment home rentals for our low-income senior residents in a safe and caring environment where they can continue to age in place independently (with or without the help of out-side services) in an active senior community.

Mission Behind Bars and Beyond
Rev. Dean Bucalos, Executive Director
PO Box 22-34, Louisville, Kentucky, 40252
(502) 396-3543
www.missionbehindbarsandbeyond.org

Mission Behind Bars and Beyond is a nonprofit, faith-based organization providing community based mentoring programs for those released from prison and returning to communities in Kentucky. In conjunction with a Disciples of Christ congregation, New Life in Christ Christian Church, which is located in a women’s halfway house, we minister to those incarcerated, train outside volunteers to form Nurture, Support and Accountability Groups (NSAG) and connect returning citizens with a NSAG which will then walk alongside each person for six months to a year to equip them for a successful re-entry into the community to which they are returning.

Oakland Peace Center
Rev. Sandhya Jha, Executive Director
111 Fairmount Avenue, Oakland, California 94611
www.oaklandpeacecenter.org

As an emerging social entrepreneurship nonprofit model of ministry, the Oakland Peace Center exists as a physical space (40,000 square feet gifted by First Christian Church of Oakland) and a network of people and organizations (over 40 Bay Area based nonprofits). It brings together more than 40 direct service, advocacy, youth empowerment, art and culture-shift nonprofits to connect and collaborate with each other in the struggle for peace and justice.

Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center (OFEC)
Rev. Sharyn Cosby, Executive Director
1020 South Garnett Road, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74128
(918) 551-6017
www.ofec.co

Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center, a related organization of In the Spirit Christian Church, is a not-for-profit agency that seeks to provide resources and assistance to individuals and their families that will empower them to live a successful and purposeful life. In an effort to reduce the disparity of minority contact with law enforcement, Oklahoma Family Empowerment Center has entered into an agreement with the City of Tulsa and partnered with various state, local, and community agencies to implement the Tulsa County Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Community and Strategic Planning Demonstration Project through a grant funded by the Office of Juvenile Affairs.

Patchwork Central / Sozo Health Ministry
Rev. John Rich and Amy Rich, Executive Directors
100 Washington Avenue, Evansville, Indiana 47713
(812) 424-2735
www.patchwork.org

Since its founding, Patchwork Central has worked to serve its neighborhood through flexible and innovative programming that matches the talents and interests of those involved to the needs of our community. Today, Patchwork serves individuals and families with a food pantry (since 1982), neighborhood hospitality (a cup of coffee, telephone usage, someone to listen, etc.), a community garden (created in 1995), low-rent facilities for other community organizations, a bicycle program for the homeless, a Health Ministry, and unique art/education programs (Arts & Smarts) that have been available free of charge to at-risk children and youth since 1980. As part of the community fabric, Patchwork Central changes the lives of those it serves by giving them a sense of hope, a place of acceptance, and a bright outlook for the future.

QC Family Tree
Rev. Helms Jarrell and Rev. Greg Jarrell, Executive Directors
2910 Parkway Avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina 28208
(704) 654-7429
www.qcfamilytree.org

QC Family Tree’s mission is to be kinfolk rooted in discipleship in West Charlotte, NC. They embody this mission through creativity, prayer, and welcome. The Family Tree offers hospitality in their homes to neighbors who are in transition. Participants enjoy family-style meals each evening with neighbors and guests and gather for prayer every weekday morning and midday. The ministry has grown to include: Freedom School summer literacy camp, Wednesday evening dinner and devotionals for youth and children, twice monthly community meals, arts activities, young adult leadership development through internship programs, edible gardens, community outreach activities, and microbusiness in order that provides employment to neighbors as well as sustainable income to their nonprofit.

Reach Beyond Mission
Rev. Mary Lu Johnston, Executive Director
15907 Braesgate Drive, Austin, Texas 78717
(512) 218-4335
www.reachbeyondmission.org

Reach Beyond Mission is a fully planned youth mission/poverty education experience. Youth join youth from other churches across the country to explore issues of culture, gender, and poverty in an urban setting. Participants volunteer at numerous metropolitan area nonprofits working with the homeless, low-income families, children, people with disabilities, and the elderly. Summer mission week focus on food justice, housing, or advocacy. RBM provides speakers, age-appropriate activities, and discussion starters to help young people explore the biblical, theological, economic, social, and political issues related to poverty. Our goal is to help youth begin to explore how to spend a lifetime changing the systems that sustain poverty through their votes, career choices, and how they spend their money.

Safe Haven Day Shelter
Joni Laurence, Co-Coordinator
6165 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, Virginia 22044
(703) 532-8220
www.fccfc.org/safe-haven/

Safe Haven in Falls Church, VA, is a drop-in program working together with Northern Virginia Family Services to provide a welcoming environment for those experiencing homelessness and poverty. This program began as an outreach program at First Christian Church to an average of 15-20 individuals and has grown to a drop-in program serving more than 100 clients weekly, now an interfaith coalition of faith-based communities contributing hot meals and volunteers to the program.

Serra Center
Lisa Senadenos, CEO
2610 Central Avenue, Suite 120, Union City, California 94587
(510) 477-1000
www.serracenter.org

Serra Center offers three types of support services for individuals with developmental disabilities. Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF-DDH) provides 24-hour care and supervision in six-bed homes in residential neighborhoods. Individuals in Supported Living Services live in the environment of their choice, with care and support based on their individual needs. Independent Living Services provide services focusing on specific identified living skills, working toward eliminating the need for services when the skills are mastered. All individuals served are active during the day either at jobs or in a day program.

SHARE (Sharing Hands: A Respite Experience)
Tom Jones, Executive Director
3500 N. A Street, Suite 2200, Midland, Texas 79705
(432) 818-1253
http://sharewtx.org

Upon the diagnosis of a child’s disability, families find themselves on a lonely journey in which they are isolated from friends, other families who care for children with special needs, and the community. The constant care demands of the child’s disability create stress and leave little time for relationships and personal care. SHARE provides respite care for these families, including parent support groups, counseling services, family events, and programming for siblings. SHARE cares for the whole family because strong families are needed to provide care for the person with special needs—now and well into the future.

Southern Christian Services for Children and Youth, Inc.
Debbie Dobbins, Executive Director
860 East River Place, Suite 104, Jackson, Mississippi 39202
(601) 354-0983
www.scscy.org

SCSCY provides services through 11 different statewide locations including therapeutic group homes for children and youth, a transitional living facility for older tens who are homeless, an array of adoption, therapeutic foster case, and post adoption services, and education services that include independent living preparation for teens in the foster care system, and abstinence education for at-risk youth.

SquareOne Villages (formerly Opportunity Village)
Rev. Dan Bryant, Executive Director
458 Blair Boulevard, Eugene, Oregon 97402
(541) 606-4455
www.squareonevillages.org

As we grow into an organization with multiple projects, Opportunity Village Eugene has recently evolved to SquareOne Villages. Our mission continues to be to create self-managed communities of low-cost tiny houses for people in need of housing. SquareOne Villages has two projects: Opportunity Village Eugene, which provides transitional shelter for approximately 35 people, and Emerald Village Eugene, an affordable housing project of 22 tiny homes being built in fall 2016. Both communities provide stable, safe and sustainable places for people in need of housing through alternative, cost-effective approaches.

StoneSoup Community Venture / Tulsa’s Table
Rev. Christy Moore, Founder and CEO
1438 S. Indianapolis Avenue, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74112
www.tulsastable.org

The mission of StoneSoup Community Venture is to provide enriching seed-to-table educational experiences as solutions to the poverty and hunger that youth living in at-risk communities face each day. Our vision and mission are based on principles of empowerment through education and experience that are positive responses to a growing need for food security in local communities. Up to 25 percent of any city’s population may not know how they will secure their next meal. A new model of addressing hunger is needed, one that is based on a well documented approach of empowerment as an effective way to lift people out of poverty, thereby creating lasting and significant social change. We are creating public gathering spaces where an earth-to-table model of food security can be demonstrated and experienced by people of all ages.

The Summit
Ken Burger, Executive Director
1400 Enterprise Drive, Lynchburg, Virginia 24502
(434) 941-7606
www.summitlynchburg.com

The Summit is a senior living community providing an environment for each resident to be engaged in life. We provide services, amenities and facilities that support an active lifestyle in Independent Living for each individual. As residents’ needs change, The Summit’s campus has a continuum of care available through Assisted Living and The Summit Health and Rehab Center.

Tennyson Center for Children
Ned Breslin, CEO
2950 Tennyson Center, Denver, Colorado 80212
(303) 433-2541
www.tennysoncenter.org

Tennyson Center provides 24-hour intensive residential care, day treatment, special education and home/community based services for approximately 150 children and their families every day. Children with severe behavioral and mental health problems along with educational delays are the primary client population. The families of these children have experienced or are experiencing extreme trauma, physical and/or sexual abuse, mental illness, substance abuse, or extreme poverty and/or homelessness. Tennyson is a leader in advocating for the needs of all children and families in need in Colorado through legislative and policy development.

Woodhaven
Mark Palmer, CEO
1405 Hathman Place, Columbia, Missouri 65201
(573) 881-9840
www.woodhaventeam.org

Woodhaven is a caring team advocating for those with disabilities. Its Community Living program supports more than 100 men and women in more than 50 apartments and homes, and its Community Connections program provides opportunities for individuals who do not work during the day. Our mission is not just about providing supports; it is about working toward a fundamental shift in how the community perceives people with disabilities. Every day, the men and women we support are living full, independent lives as active members of the community. With every shirt they buy, hour they work, and life they touch, they’re changing the face of ability.

Worcester Fellowship
Rev. Warren Hicks, Executive Director and Pastor
PO Box 307, Marlborough, Massachusetts 01752
(508) 868-3248
www.worcesterfellowship.org

Worcester Fellowship is outdoor church reaching homeless and at-risk adults with Sunday lunch, worship, bible study, weekday ministries, and leadership development. We have one theology: God loves you now, before you get help, before you get sober, before you make changes, God loves you now. We provide a listening ear, sit beside you, and travel with you on life’s sometimes difficult, sometimes joyous, journey.

NBA Leaders: Board of Trustees

(Officers)
Ms. Jackie Compton Bunch, Chair
Columbus, Ohio
Mr. Bob Cooper, Vice Chair
Denver, Colorado
Rev. Mary Lou Kegler, Secretary
Kansas City, Missouri
Mr. Robert Patterson, Treasurer
Tyler, Texas
Dr. Kerry K. Swindle, At-Large
Tucson, Arizona

NBA Leaders: Board of Trustees

(Members)
Rev. Jabari Butler
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. Willie Garcia
Yonkers, New York
Rev. Daphne Gascot Arias
Los Angeles, California
Ms. Cindy Kim Hengst
Chicago, Illinois
Ms. Audrey Jackson
Cleveland, Ohio
Mr. William Jennison
Spokane, Washington
Ms. Lisa Legeer
Jacksonville, Florida
Ms. Suzanne Quenette
Austin, Texas
Ms. Sabrina Porter
Dallas, Texas
Ms. Barbara Scamman
Seattle, Washington
Rev. Dr. Suzanne Webb
St. Louis, Missouri
Ex-Officio with Vote:
Mr. Mark D. Anderson
St. Louis, Missouri
Ex-Officio without Vote:
Mr. Michael Readinger
Cleveland, Ohio
Rev. Dr. Cathy Myers Wirt
Portland, Oregon

NBA Leaders: Staff
Mr. Mark D. Anderson, President and CEO
Rev. Dr. Dietra Wise Baker*, Organizing Specialist, Ferguson Justice Initiative
Rev. Dr. Ben Bohren*, Mission Specialist, NBA XPLOR
Rev. Dean Bucalos*, Mission Specialist, Prison and Jail Ministries Affinity Group
Rev. Dani Loving Cartwright, Associate VP of Operations
Ms. Lesley Durham, Director of Operations Accounting
Rev. Rebecca Hale, VP of Mission and Ministry
Rev. Héctor J. Hernández*, Convener, Prison and Jail Ministries Affinity Group
Rev. Monica Wedlock Kilpatrick, Director of Connect Ministries
Ms. L. Christine Koetting, Associate VP of Accounting
Rev. Virzola Law*, Mission Specialist, NBA XPLOR
Rev. April Lewton, VP of Development and Marketing
Mr. Larry J. Morris III, Incubate Program Associate
Rev. Bonnie Osei-Frimpong, Director of NBA XPLOR
Rev. Ayanna Johnson Watkins, Director of NBA Incubate Initiative
Ms. Kara Whitehouse, Administrative Assistant
Ms. Angela Whitenhill*, Convener, Mental Health and Congregational Care Affinity Group
Ms. Kasi Zieminski, Director of Marketing
Mr. Gary Zimmerman, VP of Administration and CFO
*Contract consultant staff

 

_____________________________

The General Board has reviewed GA-1712 from the National Benevolent Association. The report is submitted to the General Assembly for presentation and discussion. No action is required. (Discussion time: 12 minutes)